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THE TOWN OF 
IPSWICH, MASSACHUSETTS 

2009 ANNUAL REPORT 




2009-2010 
BOARD OF SELECTMEN 




Standing left to right (back) - Raymond K. Morley, Patrick J. McNally-Chair, and Charles D. Surpitski 
Standing left to right (front) - Elizabeth A. Kilcoyne, Ingrid F. Miles 



Cover Photo: New Bialek Playground 

Photographer: Elizabeth Dorman 

Annual Town Report Compiled by Frank Antonucci 



ANNUAL TOWN REPORT 

TOWN OF IPSWICH 
MASSACHUSETTS 

2009 




TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Roster of Town Officials and Committees 5 

May 12th, 2009 Annual Town Meeting 16 

October 19th, 2009 Special Town Meeting 27 

Board of Selectmen 49 

Finance Committee 50 

Town Manager 51 

Special Asst. Town Manager, Purchasing 52 

Department of Public Safety 53 

Police Department 53 

Fire Department 54 

Animal Control 57 

Harbors 57 

Shellfish 58 

Department of Public Works 58 

Public Works Divisions 59 

Facilities Department 60 

Cemeteries/Parks Department 62 

Department of Code Enforcement 63 

Building Department 63 

Health Department 64 

Zoning Board of Appeals 65 

Department of Planning and Development 65 

Planning Board 66 

Conservation Commission 68 

Historical Commission 69 

Housing Partnership 70 

Open Space Committee 71 

Agricultural Commission 71 

Department of Human Services 72 

Recreation Department 72 

Youth Services 73 

Council on Aging 74 

Veterans Services 75 

Department of Utilities 76 

Electric Department 76 

Water Division 77 

Wastewater Treatment 78 



TABLE OF CONTENTS (CONTINUED) 



Finance Directorate 78 

Accounting Office 78 

Treasurer/Collector 79 

Assessors Office 79 

Town Clerk 80 

Elections and Registrations 80 

MIS Department 82 

Ipswich Public Library 82 

School Department 84 

Hall-Haskell House 89 

[pswich Bay Circuit Trail Committee 89 

Government Study Committee 90 

Recycling Committee 90 

Trust Fund Commission 90 

Financial Statements June 30, 2009 91 



2009 ROSTER OF TOWN OFFICIALS AND COMMITTEES 



Elected 



Member 



Moderator 
(1 year) 

Board of Selectmen 
(3 years) 



A. James Grimes III 



Patrick J. McNally, Chair 
Elizabeth A. Kilcoyne 

Ingrid F. Miles 
Charles D. Surpitski 
Raymond K. Morley 



School Committee 
(3 years) 



Jeffrey B. Loeb, Chair 

Barry Hopping 

Edmund Traverso 

Hugh O'Flynn 

Laura Dietz 
Joan K. Arsenault 
Norman Sheppard 



Appointed 

Finance Committee 
(3 years) 



Jamie M. Fay, Chair 

Larry E. Seidler, V-Chair 

William M. Craft 

Michael J. Schaaf 

Marion W. Swan 

Richard F. Howard 

Robert A. White 

Janice Clements-Skelton 

Todd Wilson 

Lynne Gibbs, Admin. Asst. 



Whittier Regional Technical Vocational 
High School Representative 

Town Officials 



Raymond K. Morley 



Town Manager 



Robert T. Markel 



Special Assistant to the Town Manager 
Administrative Assistant to TM/BOS 



Frank V. Antonucci 
Jennifer F. Breaker 



Superintendent of Schools 

Director of Finance 
MIS Director 

Assessor 

Town Clerk 

Assistant Town Clerk 

Treasurer/Collector 

Assistant Treasurer 

Deputy Tax Collector 



Richard L. Korb 

Rita M. Negri 

Gregory Parachojuk 

Frank J. Ragonese 

Pamela Z. Carakatsane 

Kathleen A. Marini 

Kevin A. Merz 

Donald J. Carter 

Kelly and Ryan Associates Inc. 



Director of Code Enforcement 

Local Building Inspector 

Health Agent 

Food Inspector 

Plumbing & Gas Inspector 

Alternate Plumbing & Gas Inspector, 

Sealer of Weights & Measures 

Fence Viewer 

Wiring Inspector 

Asst. Wiring Inspector 



James A. Sperber 

Eric Colville 

Colleen Fermon 

Maureen Lee 

Cranney Companies 

Kevin Lombard 

Dwight Brothers 

James A. Sperber 

Donald R. Stone 

David Levesque, Sr. 



Director of Plant & Facilities 
Assistant to Facilities Director 



William A. Hodge 
Jane Spellman 



Director of Public Works 



Superintendent of Cemetery & Parks 



Richard Clarke 
Jeffrey Putur 



Fire Chief 
Fire Prevention Officer 



Arthur Howe 
Rick Smith 



Acting Police Chief 
Police Lieutenant 

Harbormaster 
Assistant Harbormaster 



Paul Nikas 
Daniel Moriarity 

Paul Nikas 
Thomas Colpitts 



Shellfish Constable 



Scott LaPreste 



Asst Shellfish Constable 



Jeremy Smith 



Emergency Management Director 
Assistant Emergency Mgt Director 



Arthur Howe 
Daniel Moriarty 



Animal Control Officer 
Assistant Animal Control Officer 



Matthew Antczak 
Girard Martin 



Director of Human Services 

Director of Council on Aging 

Town Historian 



Elizabeth M. Dorman 
Diane Mitchell 
Patricia Tyler 



Library Director 
Assistant Library Director 



Victor E. Dyer 
Genevieve Picard 



Director of Planning & Development 

Assistant Planner 

Affordable Housing Coordinator 

Open Space Program Manager 

Stewardship Coordinator 

Conservation Agent 



Glenn C. Gibbs 

Kathleen Connor 

Thomas L. Bentley 

Kiisten Grubbs 

Beth O'Connor 

David P. Pancoast 



Town Counsel 



Attorney George Hall Jr. 
Anderson and Krieger 



Director of Utilities 

Wastewater Treatment Plant Supt. 

Business Manager/Utilities 

Water Treatment Plant Supt. 

Asst. Power Plant Superintendent 

Town Engineer 



Tim Henry 
Patrick Brennan 

Mark Cousins 
Joseph Ciccotelli 

Jeffrey Turner 
Victoria Halmen 



Veterans Services District 



Terrance P. Hart 



Boards and Committees 



Affordable Housing Trust Fund Board 



Susan Monahan, Chair 
James Warner 
Michael Jones 



Glenn C. Gibbs 
Ingrid F. Miles 



Agricultural Commission 



Alternates 



Royce Knowlton, Co-Chair 

Warren Jepson, Co-Chair 

Michael Marini 

Kat Kenny 

Donald Galicki 

Dianne Cassidy 

Augusta Macrokanis 

Laura Russell 

Kelly Jacklin 

Bill Cassidy 



Athletic Playing Fields Study Committee 



Ken Swenson, Chair 

Charles D. Surpitski 

Barry Hopping 

Carl Nylen 

Susan Markos 

Elizabeth Dorman 

Kristen Grubbs 

Jeffrey Putur 



Audit Committee 



Elizabeth Kilcoyne, Chair 

Robert White (Finance Com) 

Jeff Loeb (School Committee) 

Larry Pszenney 

William Callahan 



Board of Assessors 



Frank J. Ragonese, Chair 

John Moberger 

Karen L. Rassias 



Bay Circuit Trail Committee 



Lawrence G. Eliot, Chair 

Barbara Ostberg 

Mary Cunningham 

Ralph Williams 

Norman Marsh 

Linda Coan 



Ipswich Community Access Media (ICAM) 



Robert Ryan, Chair 

Gregory Parachojuk 

Ann Savage 

James Maloney 

Scott Ames 



Cemetery & Parks Commission 



Nicholas Markos, Chair 
Harry Argeropoulos 
Theodore Lemieux 



Commission on Energy Use & 
Climate Protection 



Ken Savoie, Chair 

Edward Rauscher 

Robert Markel 

Tim Henry 

Donald Bowen 

William Bingham 

Marc Simon 

Heidi Paek 

Michael Johnson 

Adam Devoe 

Sarah Simon 



Community Development Plan 
Implementation Task Force 



William Bingham, Chair 

Thomas Mayo 

William Gallagher 

Richard Kallman 

Ingrid F. Miles 

Glenn Gibbs 

Kathleen Connor 



Commuter Rail Committee 



Dorcas Rice, Chair 

Robert Waldner 

Joseph Carlin 

Chris Curry 

Paul Sanborn 



Conservation Commission 



David Standley, Chair 

Jennifer Hughes, Vice Chair 

Sissy Folliott 

Brian F. O'Neill 



Conservation Agent 



Sharon Cushing 

Karl Kastorf 

David P. Pancoast 



Constable 



Peter Dziadose 



Council On Aging 



Elizabeth Nelson, Chair 
Cheryl Ferris 
Tone Kenney 
Dorothy Butcher 
Pat Parady 
Keith Carlson 
Claire Phillips 



Cultural Council 
(3 years) 



Terri Unger, Chair 

Deborah Barnwell 

Jennifer Carlson 

Marianne Cellucci 

Maureen Farley 

Barta Hathaway 

Linda Laterowicz 

Katherine McElwain 

Michelle Shibley-McGrath 



Design Review Board 



Alternate Members 



Maiya Dos 

Dianna Pacella 

Bryan Townsend 

Mitchell Low 

Ken Savoie 

Mary Kroesser 



Eight Towns & the Bay Committee 



Franz Ingelfinger 
Glenn Wood 



Electric Light Sub-Committee 



Charles D. Surpitski, Chair 

Raymond K. Morley 

S. Michael Schaaf 

James Engel 

Edward Sklarz 



10 



Fair Housing 



Tone Kenney 
Robert T. Markel 



Government Study Committee 



Gerry Anne Brown, Chair 

Jeremy Hathaway 

David Standley 

Laura Hamilton 

Laura Dietz 

Diana Hebert 



Hall-Haskell Standing 
Committee 



Theresa Stephens, Chair 

William Nelson 

William Thoen 

Stephanie Gaskins 

James C. Lahar 

Margaret Broekel 

Ed Sukach 



Board of Health 



Susan C. Hubbard, Chair 

Spencer R. Amesbury, MD 

Charles Hill 



Historical Commission 



June S. Gahan, Chair 

Willard Maker 

Bryan Townsend 

Francis Wiedennman 

Judy A. Field 

Marjorie H. Robie 



Housing Authority (5 years) 



Edgar Turner (State Appt.), Chair 

Tone Kenney 

Kenneth M. Blades 

Moriah K. Marsh 

Ronald Graves 



Housing Partnership 



11 



Michael Schaaf, Chair 

James M. Warner 

Michael Jones 

Edward D. Dick 

Moriah Marsh 



William "Jay" Gallagher 
Donald Bo wen 



Ipswich River Watershed 
District Advisory Board 



David Standley 



Library Trustees 



George R. Gray, Chair 
Lawrence J. Pszenny 
Marie Louise Scudder 

Hugh McCall 

Robert K. Weatherall 

Judith L. Rusin 

Helen Danforth 

William Thoen 

Marion Frost 



MAPC Representative 



Christine Sandulli 



Mosquito Control Advisory Board 



Robert A. Gambale, Chair 

Lisa Galanis 

Ed Ruta 

Ernest Brockelbank. 

Anne Wallace 



Open Space Committee 



Wayne Castonguay, Co-Chair 
Carolyn Britt, Co-Chair 
Carl Nylen 
Ralph Williams 
Glenn Hazelton 
David Standley 
Alex Van Alen 



Planning Board 

(5 years) 



Associate Member (2 years) 



Timothy A. Purinton, Co-Chair 

James A. Manzi, Co-Chair 

Robert L. Weatherall 

Cathryn Chadwick 

Brian Hone 
Suzanne Benfield 



12 



Public Safety Facilities Committee 



Charles Supitski, Chair 

Edward D. Dick 

Elizabeth Kilcoyne 

Robert T. Markel 

William Thoen 

Paul McGinley 

Roland Gallant 

John Morris 

Sean Cronin 

Jamie Fay 

Arthur Howe 

Jim Edwards 

William A. Hodge 

Richard L. Korb 

Jeffrey B. Loeb 

Jean Emerson 

Jeffrey Putur 

Peter Foote 



Recreation Committee 



Edith Cook, Chair 
Christina Mercier 

Anne Josephson 

Adam Gray 
Kathryn Sheppard 

Dan McCormick 
Matthew Bodwell 



Recycling Committee 



Tim Bishop, Chair 

Penny Devoe 

Mark Avenmarg 

Amy Frank 

Rick Clarke 

Judy Sedgewick 

David Benedix 

Mike Judy 

Elizabeth Kilcoyne (Assoc. Mem) 

Jill Gleim (Assoc. Mem.) 
Jeremiah Read (Assoc. Member) 
Fiona Stewart (Assoc. Member) 



Registrar of Voters 



Jeremy Hathaway 
Diane Young 



13 



Peter Ross 



Sandy Point Advisory Committee 



Joseph W. Parks 
Stanley W. Wood 



Shellfish Sub-Committee 



Elizabeth A. Kilcoyne, Co-Chair 

Charles D. Surpitski, Co-Chair 

Robert T. Markel 

Arnold "Pick" Thistlewood 

Wayne Castonguay 

Bradford McGowan 

Anthony Murawski 

Gary Collum 
Michael Lambros 



Shade Tree & Beautification 
Committee 



Jennifer Tougas, Co-Chair 

Daniel Morrow Co-Chair 

Robert Gra\ ino 

Armand Michaud 

Elizabeth A Kilcoyne 

Janet Craft 

Charles D. Surpitski 

Martha Varrell 

Martha Chase 

Denise King 



Trust Fund Commission 



Robert K. Weatherall, Co-Chair 

Jean Emerson, Co-Chair 

Alexander Colby 



Wastewater Sub-Committee 



Patrick J. McNally, Chair 

Elizabeth A. Kilcoyne 

Raymond Morley 

James Engel 

Brian Kubaska 



Water Sub-Committee 



Ingrid Miles, Chair 

Raymond Morley 

James Engel 

Paul Brailsford 



14 



Waterways Advisory Committee 



Ken Spellman, Chair 

Ronald Cameron 

Bill Callahan 

Evan Parker 

Jeffrey French 

John Wigglesworth 

Elton McCausland 



Zoning Board of Appeals 
(5 years) 



Robert A. Gambale, Chair. 

Benjamin Fierro 

Timothy S. Perkins 

Roger LeBlanc 

William A. Page (Alternate) 



15 



RECORD OF ACTION TAKEN AT THE 

ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 

MAY 12, 2009 

Pursuant to the foregoing warrant, the legal voters of the Town of Ipswich met in the Ipswich High 
School/Middle School Performing Arts Center in said Town of Ipswich on Tuesday, May 12, 2009. A quorum 
being present (219 present - 200 required), the meeting was called to order by the Moderator Mr. A. James 
Grimes, III, at 7:50 p.m. 

Counters appointed by the Moderator were Shirley Berry and Janice Colter. 

Non-registered persons were given permission to attend the meetings as spectators and were seated on the floor 
in the back of the room on the left of the stage. 

ARTICLE 1 CONSENT CALENDAR 

On Motion of Ingrid F. Miles, duly seconded, it 

Carried Unanimously to: 

'1) Fix the salary and compensation of all elected Town Officers as presented in the town and school operating 
budgets; 

'2) Choose the following officers, viz: a Moderator for one [1] year; one [1] Selectman for three [3] years; two 
[2] members of the School Committee for three [3] years; and one (1) member of the Housing Authority for 
five years, the above officers to be voted on one ballot at the YMCA Gymnasium, 1 10 County Road, on 
TUESDAY, MAY 19, 2009. The polls shall open at 7:00 a.m. and shall close at 8:00 p.m.; 

(3) Transfer $275,000 from surplus funds in the Electric Division to the General Fund; 

A) Authorize the Board of Selectmen to appoint temporarily a member of said Board to Acting Town Manager 
for a limited period of time not to exceed the date of the 2010 Annual Town Meeting for purposes of 
vacation, leave, or absence in accordance with Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 268A, sections 20 and 
21A. 

\RTICLE 2 FINANCE COMMITTEE ELECTION 

3n Motion of Janice A. Clements-Skelton, duly seconded, it 

Harried Unanimously to: 

ilect Robert White to the Finance Committee for a term of three (3) years, 

ARTICLE 3 PRIOR YEAR UNPAID BILLS 

)n Motion of Charles D. Surpitski, duly seconded, it 
Carried Unanimously to: 

16 



Appropriate the sum of $1,016.83 to pay bills incurred in prior years and remaining unpaid: 
DEPARTMENT VENDOR AMOUNT NOTES 



Facilities Management 


Verizon 


$582.00 


Five unpaid bills from 2008 




Verizon 


$51.90 


Visitor Center - 2008 




Verizon 


$26.47 


Police Dept - 2007 










Fire Department/Emergency 
Mgt. 


Gall's 


$120.16 


Uniform expense 




Northeast Hospital 
Corp 


$28.26 


Injured on duty claim - town 
share 




Northeast Hospital 
Corp 


$99.29 


Injured on duty claim - town 
share 










Police 


Ipswich Center, 
Inc. 


$108.75 


Injured on duty claim - town 
share 




Total 


$1,016.83 













And to meet this appropriation by raising $1,016.83 in taxes. 



ARTICLE 4 



FY 2010 MUNICIPAL OPERATING BUDGET 



On Motion of Ingrid F. Miles, duly seconded, it 
Carried Unanimously to: 

(1) Raise and appropriate the sum of $12,798,554 for the purposes indicated in the FY 2010 Municipal 
Operating Budget as outlined in the Finance Committee Report, and that, in addition to the $12,798,554 
the Town vote to raise and appropriate: 

for Excluded Debt Service $1,064,392 

for a Total Appropriation of $1 3,862,946; 

(2) And to transfer from available funds: 

from Free Cash $50,000 

from Free Cash (restricted revenue - Library) $27,125 

from 4% Tourism $1,000 

from Library Construction Grant $60,300 

from the overlay surplus $92,500 

17 



Total Available Funds.... $230,925 

Leaving a net to be raised and assessed of $1 3,632,021 



\RTICLE 5 



TOWN BUDGET AMENDMENTS 



On Motion of Patrick J. McNally, duly seconded, it 

Carried Unanimously to 

Amend the Town's action taken under Articles 5 and 10 of the May 13, 2008, Annual Town Meeting (the 
hY'09 Municipal Operating Budget), to transfer: 









FROM 


TO 


Misc Exp 


11931-5110 


Mgmnt Transfer 


7,221.56 




Legal 


11242-5312 


Services 




7,221.56 


Reserve 










Fund 


11322-5730 


Reserve Fund 
Veteran's 


12,054.00 




Veterans 


15432-5772 


Medical 




12,054.00 


Equip 










Maint 


14221-5115 


Perm Wages 


3,100.00 






14221-5131 


Overtime 


1,010.06 






14222-5215 


Gasoline 


40,000.00 






14222-5216 


Diesel Fuel 


35,000.00 






14222-5482 


Tires 


1,466.20 






14222-5486 


Sweeper Maint. 


4,161.81 




Highway 


14241-5115 


Perm Wages 


14,936.47 






14241-5121 


Temp PT 


1,000.00 






14241-5123 


Other Pay 


13,000.00 






14241-5131 


Overtime 


5,000.00 






14241-5141 


Diff/Inc 


2,231.20 
FROM 


TO 




14241-5197 


Uniform Allow 


455.00 






14241-5198 


CDL 


1,500.00 






14242-5214 


Street Lights 


5,000.00 






14242-5241 


Paint Lines 


14,533.81 






14242-5242 


Road Treatment 


49,482.21 






14242-5408 


Infras Activ 


631.92 






14242-5511 


Training 


110.00 






14242-5532 


Traffic Signs 


1,277.01 





18 



: 





14242-5534 


Rails/Fences 


4,484.59 






14242-5711 


Mileage 


100.00 






14242-5712 


Meals/Lodging 


1,100.00 






14242-5713 


License Reg 


80.00 






14242-5731 


Assoc Dues 


10.00 






14242-5811 


Building Study 


25,000.00 




Forestry 


14251-5115 


Perm Wages 


11,479.24 






14251-5121 


Temp PT 


5,944.00 






14251-5123 


Other Pay 


3,527.63 






14252-5731 


Assoc Dues 


105.00 




Sanitation 


14312-5385 


Sanit Coll 


2,000.00 






14312-5536 


Shop Supplies 


5,950.00 




SWTS 


14322-5383 


Oth Purch Svc 


80.00 




Facilities 


1472-5251 


Building Repairs 




25,000.00 


Snow & 










Ice 


14231-5131 


OT 




40,902.26 


Snow & 










Ice 


14232-5539 


Other PW Supp 


273,031.71 


187,853.89 
273,031.71 



And, 

That the Town vote to amend its action taken under Article 4 of the May 12, 2009, Annual Town Meeting (thl 
FY' 10 Municipal Operating Budget), to appropriate: 



From 



To 



Free Cash Assessors 

Waterways Improvement Fund Harbormaster 

Total: 



$39,000 
$30,564 
$69,564 



So that the 2010 Municipal Operating Budget, as so amended and inclusive of override debt service, shall tot 
$13,932,510, offset by revenues totaling $300,489, leaving an amount to be raised and assessed of $13,632,0 



ARTICLE 6 



FY 2010 SCHOOL BUDGET 



On Motion of Joan K. Arsenault, duly seconded, it 

Carried Unanimously to 

(1) Raise and appropriate the sum of $19,980,995 for the School Department budget for FY 2010, and 



(2) Transfer from available funds: 

Free Cash $50,000 

Overlay Surplus $92,500 

Total Available Funds $142,500 

19 



[paving a net to be raised and assessed of S 19,838,495 

4RTICLE 7 HIGH SCHOOL/MIDDLE SCHOOL DEBT SERVICE 

3n Motion of Dianne Ross, duly seconded, it 

Carried Unanimously to 

R.aise and appropriate the sum of $2,542,513 for FY 2010 debt service payments related to the construction and 
urnishing of the new Middle School and High School including, without limitation, moving expenses and 
ixpenses necessary to secure the former Whipple Middle School. 

\RTICLE 8 WIND TURBINE PROJECT DEBT 

3n Motion of Hugh M. O'Flynn, duly seconded, it 
Carried Unanimously 

That action on this article be postponed indefinitely. 

\RTICLE 9 CAPITAL IMPROVEMENTS STABILIZATION FUND APPROPRIATION 

)n Motion of James W. Foley, duly seconded, it 
Harried Unanimously to 

/ote the following transfers from the Capital Improvements Stabilization Fund: 

) Transfer $17,465 to fund conversion of the heating system at the Library to natural gas; and to accept a 
.9,000 contribution from the Trustees of the Ipswich Public Library from the annual Library Incentive 
jrant/Municipal Equalization Grant from the Commonwealth of Massachusetts to fund part of the expense; and 

) Transfer $45,000 to fund conversion of the heating system at the Police Department Headquarters to natural 
as; 

o that the amount transferred from the Capital Improvements Stabilization Fund totals S62,465. 

iRTICLE 10 WHITTIER REGIONAL HIGH SCHOOL BUDGET 

)n Motion of Raymond K. Morley, duly seconded, it 

'arried Unanimously to 

.aise and appropriate the sum of $452,406 for the Town's share of the FY 2010 annual operating, capital and 
ebt service expenses of the Whittier Regional Vocational Technical High School District. 

20 



ARTICLE 11 FY 2010 WATER & SEWER BUDGETS 

On Motion of Patrick J. McNally, duly seconded, it 
Carried Unanimously to 

1) Raise and appropriate the sum of $2,403,850 for the FY 2010 operating, debt service, and capital expenses 
the Water Division, Department of Utilities, said sum to be offset in part by $23,836 from the water surplus 
account; $43,500 from water liens; $22,000 in application fees and other miscellaneous revenues, with the 
balance of said appropriation being met by revenues of $2,314,5 14 of the Water Division during FY 2010; an 

2) Raise and appropriate the sum of $1,562,843 for the FY 2010 operating, debt service, and 
capital expenses of the Wastewater Division, Department of Utilities, said sum to be offset in 
part by $22,972 from sewer liens; $8,000 in sewer betterment payments; $458,500 in septage 
treatment fees, Agresource royalties, application fees and other miscellaneous revenues; 
with the balance of said appropriation being met by revenues of $1 ,073,371 of the Wastewater Division durin 
FY 2010. 

ARTICLE 12 WATER DEPARTMENT BOND 

On Motion of James W. Foley, duly seconded, it 
Carried Unanimously to 

1) Authorize the Treasurer to borrow a sum of $2,395,000, to replace water mains on Washington Street 
($814,220) and North Main Street ($931,280) and to fund capital improvements at the Water Treatment 
Plant ($649,500); and 

2) Raise this appropriation by authorizing the Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of Water 
Commissioners, to issue bonds or serial notes under the provisions of Massachusetts General Laws Chaptt 
44, as amended. 

ARTICLE 13 CITIZENS PETITION: FUNDING FOR THE 375 th ANNIVERSARY 

On Motion of Nathaniel Pulsifer, duly seconded, 
Main Motion passed (123 - Yes and 93 - No) to 

1) Appropriate $50,000 in public funds to support a series of programs during the summer 
of 2009 in commemoration of the 375th anniversary of the founding of Ipswich; and 

2) Transfer these funds from Free Cash to the Ipswich Partnership, a 501(c) 3 nonprofit corporation. 

A motion was made by Elizabeth A. Kilcoyne, to 

Amend the Citizen's Petition to replace the $50,000 with $20,000 and to 

1) Appropriate $20,000 in public funds to support a series of programs during the summer 
of 2009 in commemoration of the 375th anniversary of the founding of Ipswich; and 

21 



Transfer these funds from Free Cash to the Ipswich Partnership, a 501(c) 3 nonprofit 
corporation. 

le amended motion failed to pass (97 - Yes and 114 - No) 



RTICLE 14 



CAPITAL IMPROVEMENTS BOND 



i Motion of Shirley A. Berry, duly seconded, 

otion carried to divide the question. 

l Motion of James W. Foley, duly seconded, 

otion passed by a 2/3 rd vote (30 - Yes and 8 - No) to 

Jthorize the Treasurer to borrow a sum of SI 7 1,231 for the following capital purchases: 



Department # 


Department 


Object Code 


Description 


Funding 


472 


Facilities 


5812 


Town Hall Phase, II Window 
Replacement 


S50.000 


620 


Recreation 


5815 


Bialek Park Play Structure 
Replacement 


S36.231 


620 


Recreation 


5815 


Renovation of 90' Baseball Diamond 


S85,000 










S17U31 



id to raise this appropriation by authorizing the Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, to 
•ue bonds or serial notes under the provisions of Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 44, as amended. 

l Motion of James W. Foley, duly seconded, 

otion failed (22 - Yes and 44 - No) to 

ithorize the Treasurer to borrow a sum of SI 3 1,145 for the following capital purchases: 



CAR 1644 


FORD 


2006 


Crown Vic (Patrol) 




Replace with 


FORD 


2009 


Crown Vic (Patrol) 


$28,205 


CAR 1648 


FORD 


2001 


Crown Vic (Chief) 




Replace with 


FORD 


2009 


Fusion 


$23,000 


CAR 1646 


FORD 


2003 


Expedition (Command) 




Replace with 


FORD 


2009 


Ford Escape Hybrid (4x4) 


$28,470 


C2 


FORD 


1996 


Explorer (Fire Prevention) 




Replace with 


FORD 


2009 


Ford Escape Hybrid (4x4) 


$28,470 


TM-l 


FORD 


1996 


Taurus (TM & Health) 




Replace with 


FORD 


2009 


Ford Fusion 


$23,000 


KTICLE 15 PAVEMENT MANAGEMENT PROGRAM BOND 








22 





On Motion of James W. Foley, duly seconded, 
Motion failed to pass (88 - Yes and 72 - No) to 

1) Borrow $550,000 to implement the first year of the Pavement Management Program of the 
Department of Public Works; and 

2) Raise this appropriation by authorizing the Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, to issi 
bonds or serial notes under the provisions of Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 44, as amended. 

ARTICLE 16 CHAPTER 90 

On Motion of Patrick J. McNally, duly seconded, 

Motion carried by a 2/3 rd voice vote to 

Appropriate the sum of $33 1 ,523 under the provisions of Chapter 90 of the General Laws to obtain any 
materiel, equipment and/or services incidental thereto; and to authorize the Board of Selectmen to acquire 
easements in conjunction therewith by purchase, gift, lease, eminent domain or otherwise; and in furtherance 
the project(s), to authorize the Board of Selectmen to apply for, accept, and expend any federal, state and/or 
private grants without further appropriation; and to meet this appropriation by transferring an equal sum frorr 
Chapter 90 available funds. 

A motion by the Moderator, duly seconded, to continue the meeting after 11:00 p.m. was approved by ; 
voice vote. 

The quorum was questioned by registered voter, William A. Gottlieb, 14 Middle Road. A count of the 
registered voters was conducted and the Moderator declared that there were 179 registered voters in til 
auditorium. The meeting was adjourned at 11:34 p.m. The Moderator announced that there would be 
meeting on Wednesday, May 13, 2009, at 11:00 a.m. in the Town Manager's Office, Town Hall, 25 Gre< 
Street, to set the date for the adjourned session. 

Adjourned Session- May 13, 2009: 

The May 13, 2009, meeting in the Town Manager's Office began at 11:00 a.m. and it was voted to set tl 
adjourned session for June 1, 2009, at 7:30 p.m. at the Ipswich High School/Middle School Performing 
Arts Center and, if need be, on June 2, 2009, at the Town Hall Gymnasium, 25 Green Street, at 7:30 p.r 
This meeting was adjourned at 11:50 a.m. 



Adjourned Session- June 1, 2009: 



rum 



Pursuant to the foregoing warrant, the legal voters of the Town of Ipswich met in the Ipswich High 
School/Middle School Performing Arts Center in said Town of Ipswich on Monday, June 2, 2009. A quoru 
being present (245 present - 200 required), the meeting was called to order by the Moderator Mr. A. James 
Grimes, III, at 7:45 p.m. 

Counters appointed by the Moderator were Shirley Berry, Janice Colter and Michelle Jolliffe. 

Non-registered persons were given permission to attend the meetings as spectators and were seated on the flo 
in the back of the room on the left of the stage. 

23 



iTICLE 17 REVOLVING FUNDS: COUNCIL ON AGING: HISTORICAL COMMISSION 

HEALTH DIVISION; SHELLFISH DEPARTMENT & FACILITIES 
MANAGEMENT 

i Motion of Elizabeth A. Kilcoyne, duly seconded, 
lotion carried unanimously to 

-authorize for FY 2010 the following revolving funds established under Massachusetts General Laws 
lapter 44, Section 53E Vi: 

I A Council on Aging Revolving Fund, to be funded through activity fees and to be used to pay for special 
activities, expendable supplies and/or part-time wages, with no more than $100,000 to be expended by the 
Council on Aging from monies transferred into said fund during FY 2010; and 

I An Historical Commission Revolving Fund, to pay for preservation of Town records and the purchase of 
expendable supplies, with no more than $5,000 to be expended by the Historical Commission from monies 
transferred into said fund during FY 2010, with the source of such funds being the sale of publications such 
as replicas of the Declaration of Independence and other historical documents; and 

) A Health Division Revolving Fund, the use of said fund to finance additional part-time help in the Health 
Division and to pay related expenditures with no more than $7,000 to be expended by the Health Division 
in FY 2010 from funds transferred into said fund during FY 2010, with the source of such funds being 
housing code inspection fees; and 

) A Health Department Public Health Revolving Fund, to be funded through Medicare Part B 
reimbursements, the use of said fund to cover the costs of administering influenza and pneumococcal 
vaccines with no more than $10,000 to be expended by the Health Department from monies transferred into 
the Public Health revolving fund during Fiscal 2010; and 

) A Shellfish Department Revolving Fund, to be funded through a surcharge of $50 on commercial 
shellfish licenses, the use of said fund to enhance the shellfish resources of the Town under the guidance of 
the Shellfish Advisory Subcommittee to the Selectmen and Town Manager with no more than $15,000 to 
be expended from the Shellfish Department Revolving Fund during Fiscal 2010; and 

) A Facilities Department Revolving Fund, to be funded from custodial fees charged to users of Town Hall 
facilities, the use of said fund to pay for custodial services associated with the use of the gymnasium and 
other Town Hall facilities by outside organizations and for special events sponsored by municipal 
departments. No more than $10,000 may be expended from the Facilities Department Revolving Fund 
from monies transferred into the fund during Fiscal 2010 

RTICLE 18 COMMITTEE REPORTS 

a Motion of Charles D. Surpitski, duly seconded, 
Lotion carried unanimously to 

xept the reports of, and continue the following committees as standing committees of the Town: the Historic 
istrict Study Committee; the Commuter Rail Committee; Ipswich Coalition on Youth; Hall-Haskell 

24 



Committee; the Open Space & Recreation Committee and the Ad Hoc Committee examining the Feoffees of til 
Grammar School. 

ARTICLE 19 PUBLIC CONSUMPTION OF MARIJUANA 

On Motion of Ingrid F. Miles, duly seconded, 

A motion to move the question was voted unanimously and the 

Main Motion was defeated by a voice vote to 

Amend the Town by-laws, as printed in Article 19 of the Warrant, to prohibit public consumption of marijuan; 
(tetrahdrocannabinol), making use of the drug in public places and on passenger conveyances operated by a 
common carrier a violation punishable by a fine of up to $300 for repeat violations, with enforcement through 
noncriminal citation. 

ARTICLE 20 ACCEPTANCE OF STATE LEGISLATION; MILITARY LEAVE 

On Motion of Charles D. Surpitski, duly seconded, 

A motion to move the question carried by a voice vote and 

Main Motion passed by a voice vote to 

Accept two provisions of state enabling legislation providing benefits to Town employees, specifically, 1) 
M.G.L. Ch. 33, Sec. 59, which provides a limited number of training days to members of the National Guard < 
reserves; and 2) M.G.L., Ch. 1 82, Sec. 77 of the Legislative Acts of 2008, which provides for compensation a 
other benefits to public employees who have been called to active military service since September 11, 200L , 

ARTICLE 21 ACCEPTANCE OF STATE LEGISLATION: POST EMPLOYMENT 

BENEFITS TRUST FUND 

On Motion of Elizabeth A. Kilcoyne, duly seconded, 

Motion carried by a voice vote to 

Accept state enabling legislation, M.G.L., Chapter 32B, Section 20, which governs group 
health insurance for active and retired employees of local governments and which permits cities 
and towns to set up a special trust fund to be called, the Other Post Employment Benefits 
(OPEB) Liability Trust Fund, for appropriations made to cover the unfunded actuarial liability for 
health care and other post-employment benefits for retirees. 

ARTICLE 22 LEASE PURCHSE AGREEMENT 

On Motion of Charles D. Surpitski, duly seconded, 

Motion carried unanimously to 

Approve of a five year lease/purchase agreement for the procurement and installation of an 
office communications system that will take advantage of the Town's newly installed fiber optic 

25 



:twork. 

1 RTICLE23 SPECIAL ACT: TO AMEND CHAPTER 5 OF THE ACTS OF 1775 

n Motion of Jamie M. Fay, duly seconded, 

otion to move the question failed (289 - Yes and 158 - No) 

•ain motion carried (295 - Yes and 148 - No) to 

jthorize the Board of Selectmen to petition the General Court to approve a special act amending a 1765 
itute specifying the method of appointing the Feoffees of the Grammar School, the proposed legislation 
tablishing a new board of Feoffees with two members appointed by the School Committee, two members 
pointed by the Board of Selectmen, two members appointed by the Finance Committee and one member 
pointed by the Town Meeting, as printed in Article 23 of the Warrant, and further to authorize the Board of 
lectmen to approve any additional amendments thereto which are within the scope of the general public 
jectives of this petition. 

RTICLE 24 RENAMING A PORTION OF SOFFRON LANE TO "BREWERY PLACE" 

i Motion of Patrick J. McNally, duly seconded, 

otion carried unanimously to 

:name that portion of the accepted street Soffron Lane, which is located between the easterly and westerly 
*s of Brown Square, from its current name to "Brewery Place." 

mCLE 25 INCREASING DEMAND PAYMENT FOR DELINQUENT TAXES 

l Motion of Ingrid F. Miles, duly seconded, 

otion carried by voice vote to 

;rease the fee charged for each written demand issued by the Town Collector from Five Dollars ($5.00) to 
? teen Dollars ($15.00) to be added and collected as part of the tax as authorized by M.G.L., Chapter 60, 
ction 15. 

mCLE 26 RECONSIDERATION 

i Motion of Jamie M. Fay, duly seconded, 
otion carried by voice vote 

at action on this article is postponed indefinitely. 

! "eting adjourned at 1 1 : 10 p.m. on June 1 , 2009. 

spectfully submitted, 
mela Z. Carakatsane, CMMC, CMC 
' wn Clerk 

26 



RECORD OF ACTON TAKEN AT THE ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 

OCTOBER 19, 2009 

Pursuant to the foregoing warrant, the legal voters of the Town of Ipswich met in the Ipswich High 
School/Middle School Performing Arts Center in said Town of Ipswich on Monday, October 19, 2009. A 
quorum being present (601 - 200 required), the meeting was called to order by the Moderator, Mr. A. James 
Grimes, III, at 7:40 p.m. 

Counters appointed by the Moderator were James Engle, Joni Soffron and William Skelton. 

Non-registered persons were given permission to attend the meeting as spectators and were seated on the 
floor in the back of the room on the left of the stage. 



ARTICLE 1 



FY'09 UNPAID BIL] 



A motion was made by Mr. Patrick J. McNally, and duly seconded to: 

Appropriate the sum of $9,360.01 to pay unpaid bills incurred in prior years and remaining unpaid: 
ACCOUNT VENDOR AMOUNT TOTAL 



LEGAL 



FACILITIES 



FIRE 



POLICE 



VETERANS' 
MEDICAL 



Kopelman & Paige 
Kopelman & Paige 
REW Environmental 
REW Environmental 



June 9 bill rec'd after 
999.56 7/15/09 

FY 08 Outstanding items rec'd 
849.75 6/09 

FY 09 Outstanding item rec'd 
3,661.50 after 7/15 

FY09 Outstanding item rec'd 
1,097.50 after 7/15 









$6,608.31 






FY 09 rec'd after 




Verizon 


49.99 


7/15/09 

FY 08 rec'd after 




Verizon 


166.32 


ATM 5/09 










$216.31 






Injury on 




Beacon Family Medicine 


55.97 


duty 
Injury on 




Northeast Rehab Hospital 


131.80 


duty 










$187.77 






Injury on 




Coastal Orthopedics 


65.91 


duty 




Lahey 




Injury on 




Clinic 


130.12 


duty 
Injury on 




Northeast Hospital Corp. 


77.80 


duty 





Caldwell Nursing & Rehab 
Lahey 



1,754.07 
14.71 
27 



$273.83 



Clinic 

Microsurgical Eye 

Consultants 30.00 

FY 09 bill rec'd 
The Ipswich Center 275.00 9/09 



$2,073.78 



TOTAL FOR ALL TOWN 

DEPTMENTS: 9,360.01 

d to meet this appropriation by transferring $9,360.01 from free cash. 

oderator's Declaration: Motion carried unanimously 



TTICLE 2 FY'10 TOWN BUDGET AMENDMENTS 

motion was made by Ms. Elizabeth A. Kilcoyne, and duly seconded to: 

nend its action taken under Article 4 of the May 12, 2009, Annual Town Meeting (the FY' 10 Municipal 
>erating Budget) as follows: 

1) reduce debt service principal (17002-5910) by $90,214 and long term interest (17002-5915) by $45,670 
and further reduce $3,678 from the management transfer account for a total reduction of $139,562; and 

2) appropriate $100,000 to be added to the DPW Snow and Ice Division budget (14232-5272) to increase 
funding for snow and ice operations for the winter of 2009-10; and 

3) transfer $18,000 from the Ambulance Account (12102-5381) to the Facilities Department (14723-5812) 
to fund granite covering of the landing in the front of Town Hall; and 

4) transfer $1,072 from long term debt interest (17002-5915) to short term debt interest (17002-5916); and 

5) appropriate $55,920 from free cash to the OPEB Special Revenue Fund (T-28); and 

6) appropriate $20,000 from free cash to the Building Inspector (12513-5821) to fund purchase of permit 
tracking software; and 

7) transfer $28,000 from free cash to fund the purchase of a police cruiser (12103-5818); and 

8) transfer $20,459 from free cash to Town Clerk - Elections (1 1621-5121) to fund a state primary and 
general election for the office of U.S. Senator; and 

9)Transfer $100,000 from free cash to a special legal account, Legal Services-Feoffees (1 1242-5325) to 
fund legal costs and associated property appraisal for potential legal action in the Essex Probate Court 
regarding the Feoffees of the Grammar School. 



28 



10) Re-program $45,000 appropriated under Article 9 of the May 12, 2009 Annual Town Meeting for 
replacement of Police Department heating system to repair roofs at Linebrook Station, the Central Fire 
Station and the Highway Garage; 



so that the total Fiscal 2010 municipal operating budget of $13,862,946 as so amended and inclusive of oven 
debt service, shall total $14,047,763 leaving the amount to be raised and assessed as $13,592,459. 

An amended motion was made by Mr. Robert A. White, and duly seconded to: 

Remove (2.7) the transfer of $28,000 from free cash to fund a purchase of a police cruiser, and (2.2) to 
appropriate $100,000 to the Reserve Fund instead of the DPW Snow and Ice account. These actions will 
decrease the 2010 Municipal Operating Budget to $14,019,763. 

Moderator's Declaration: Amended motion failed to pass on a voice vote. A hand count for the anient 
motion failed (205 Yes - 266 No). 

Moderator's Declaration: Main motion carried by a voice vote 

ARTICLE 3 FY'10 SCHOOL BUDGET AMENDMENTS 

A motion was made by Ms. Laura H. Dietz, and duly seconded, to: 

Amend its action taken under Article 6 of the May 12, 2009, Annual Town Meeting (the FY' 10 School 
Operating Budget), as follows: 

1) transfer $85,137 from free cash to reimburse the School Department for Medicaid funds deposited inl 
the General Fund during Fiscal 2009; and 

2) reduce the School Department budget by $112,851 to compensate for the further reduction in state ait 
the conclusion of the state budget process; 

so that the total appropriation under this article will decrease from $19,980,995 to $19,953,281, leaving the 
amount to be raised and assessed as $19,725,644. 

Moderator's Declaration: Motion carried unanimously I 

ARTICLE 4 CITIZENS PETITION 

A motion was made by Ms. Ingrid F. Miles, and duly seconded, to: 

Table this article indefinitely. 

A motion to move the question and stop debate carried by voice vote. 

Moderator's Declaration: Motion carried bv a voice vote 

ARTICLE 5 FEOFFEES TRUST AGREEMENT j 

29 



motion was made by Ms. Elizabeth A. Kilcoyne, duly seconded, to: 

quest the School Committee to promptly take such actions as are necessary to effectuate the modification of the Trust 
:ating the Feoffees of the Grammar School, in a form determined by the School Committee, in consultation with other 
vn bodies, including the Board of Selectman and Finance Committee, such action to include a petition to the Probate 
•urt for Essex County, with or without consent of other parties. 

jderator's Declaration: Motion carried unanimously 

3TICLE 6 DISPOSITION OF PARCELS 

notion was made by Mr. Raymond K. Morley, and duly seconded, to: 

thorize the Board of Selectmen to sell and convey, for a minimum purchase price of $6,400, subject to such terms, 
.ements and/or covenants as the Board of Selectmen may prescribe, a portion of a property at the rear of 48 and 50 
rthridge Road, described as Parcel 8 on Assessor's Map 15 A. 

jderator's Declaration: Motion carried unanimously 

3TICLE 7 OPEN SPACE PARCELS LIST 

notion was made by Mr. Patrick J. McNally, duly seconded, to: 

d to the Open Space Parcels List, (as referenced in Article 1 8 of the Warrant for the April 3, 2000 Annual Town 
:eting), the following parcel: 

Land now or formerly of Joseph A. Brear, Jr. as Trustee of The Buttonwood Nominee Trust, consisting of 
approximately 56.21 acres on Heartbreak Road in Ipswich, Massachusetts, identified on the Town of 
Ipswich Assessor's Map as Parcel 10 on Map 54D; 

>derator's Declaration: Motion carried 

VTICLE 8 OPEN SPACE PROGRAM 

notion was made by Mr. Patrick J. McNally, duly seconded, to: 

. propriate and authorize the Treasurer with the approval of the Selectmen to borrow a sum of money not to exceed $2.2 

lion for the purpose of acquiring one or more perpetual restriction interests pursuant to MGL CH 1 84 Sections 31-33 
| ;r a portion of a property known as the Maplecroft Farm, consisting of land as described below and shown on a map 
! ing been placed on file in the office of the Director of Planning and Development and in the Office of the Town Clerk 
September 30, 2009: 

• Land now or formerly of Joseph A. Brear, Jr. as Trustee of The 96 Essex Road Realty Trust, consisting of 
approximately 27.00 +/- acres of land on Essex Road in Ipswich, Massachusetts identified on the Town of 
Ipswich Assessor's Map as Parcel 13 on Map 63B, and more particularly described in that certain Deed recorded 
in the Essex County Registry of Deeds at Book 12483, Page 127; 

• Land now or formerly of Joseph A. Brear, Jr. as Trustee of the 2002 Buttonwood Nominee Trust, consisting 
of approximately 95.48 +/- acres of land on Argilla Road in Ipswich, Massachusetts identified on the Town of 
Ipswich Assessor's Map as Parcel 14 on Map 54B, and more particularly described in that certain Deed recorded 
in the Essex County Registry of Deeds at Book 18552, Page 516; 

• Land now or formerly of Joseph A. Brear, Jr. and Neil St. John Raymond as Trustees of The Buttonwood 

30 



Nominee Trust, consisting of approximately 164.31 +/- acres of land on Essex and Heartbreak Roads in Ipswi 
Massachusetts, also known as: 

o Assessor's Map 54D Parcel 10, consisting of approximately 56.21 acres; 

o Assessor's Map 63B Parcel 12, consisting of approximately 47 acres; 

o Assessor's Map 64 Parcel 7, consisting of approximately 49.6 acres; and 

o Assessor's Map 64 Parcel 5C, consisting of approximately 1 1 .5 acres; 

and more particularly described in those certain Deeds recorded in the Essex County Registry of Deeds at Boo j 
9365, Page 392; Book 9428, Pages 212 and 214; and Book 6617, Page 372. 

And further, that the terms of said restrictions in the land described above, if acquired by the Town, to be recommende ! 
by the Conservation Commission of the Town of Ipswich and approved by the Board of Selectmen, and to be held in 
perpetuity by the Conservation Commission, or to be co-held with a non-profit land conservation organization or a stat 
agency including but not limited to the Department of Conservation and Recreation and/or the Department of Agriculti 
Resources; and that the Conservation Commission enter into all agreements and execute any and all instruments as ma 
be necessary on behalf of the Town of Ipswich to effect said acquisition; 

A motion to move the question and stop debate carried by voice vote. 

Moderator's Declaration: Motion carried by a voice vote 



ARTICLE 9 AMENDING THE GENERAL BYLAWS: SCENIC ROADS 

A motion was made by Mr. Robert Weatherall, and was duly seconded, to: 

1 ) To designate the following streets in Ipswich as Scenic Roads upon favorable recommendation by the Planning 
Board, and pursuant to C.40, § 15c of the Massachusetts General Laws: 

• Linebrook Road from Howe Street to Leslie Road 

• Mile Lane 

• Old Right Road from Route 1 to Linebrook Road 

• Paradise Road 

• Plains Road; and 

2) Amend "Chapter XII. Use of Streets, Sidewalks, and Public Places", Section "10. Scenic Roads" of the General 
Bylaws as set forth in Article 9 of the warrant for the October 19, 2009 Special Town Meeting, with the following 
amendments: 

Amend "c) (i)" of the article, second paragraph under the proposed paragraph "a.", by deleting the words "be draw 
at a scale of 1" = 40' or to a scale approved by the Planning Board, and shall", as well as the words "north arrow," 
by adding a second sentence to the same paragraph, to read as follows: "A plan drawn to scale is preferred, but not 
required."; and 

Amend "c) (iv)" of the article, under the proposed subsection "(5.5) Tree Replacement", as follows: Revise the firs 
sentence by deleting the words "the applicant shall be required", and substituting in lieu thereof the words "the 
Planning Board, at its discretion, may require the applicant"; and by deleting the second sentence in its entirety and 
substituting in lieu thereof the following sentence: "For trees that are 1 8 inches or more in caliper, measured four f 
from the ground, the Planning Board may require the removed tree to be replaced with two trees of at least a two ar 
one-half inch caliper, measured four feet from the ground."; and 

31 



Amend "c)" of the article by adding a paragraph "v.", said paragraph to read as follows: "v. Modify subsection "(5.3) 
Timing of the Hearing" by adding, after the words "properly filed request", the phrase ", and shall take action on the 
request within 45 days of the hearing being held." 

Amend "e) (ii)" of the article, under proposed subsection "(7.8)", by deleting from the third sentence the words "stone 
piers" 

dele 9 of the Warrant for the Special Town Meeting of October 19, 2009: 

Designate the following streets in Ipswich as Scenic Roads upon favorable recommendation by the Planning Board, 
and pursuant to C.40, § 15c of the Massachusetts General Laws: 

• Linebrook Road from Howe Street to Leslie Road 

• Mile Lane 

• Old Right Road from Route 1 to Linebrook Road 

• Paradise Road 

• Plains Road; and 

Amend "Chapter XII. Use of Streets, Sidewalks, and Public Places", Section "10. 
Scenic Roads" of the General Bylaws by: 

a) Amending "DEFINITIONS" as follows: 

(i) add to the paragraph following DEFINITIONS, after the words "contained in that statute", the words ", or 
otherwise,"; 

(ii) add, in the correct alphabetical sequence, definitions of "Abutter", "Major Branch", "Posting", and "Tree 
Warden", said definitions to read as follows: 

"Abutter 

Shall mean all property owners, including those across the street, abutting the property where work 
requiring a scenic road hearing is required."; and 

"Major Branch 

Shall mean a living branch that is fully attached to a tree (as defined herein) and that has a diameter of 
three inches or more, 12 inches from the point at which said branch connects to the tree."; and 

"Posting 

Shall mean the marking of a tree or stone wall along a road for the purpose of a scenic road hearing. For 
trees, such marking as described in M.G.L. c. 87, § 3 (Shade Tree Act). For stone walls, a ribbon or other 
appropriate flagging material shall be temporarily affixed at the limit of work on both ends of the stone 
wall."; and 

'Tree Warden 

Shall mean the Town of Ipswich Tree Warden or designated deputy;" and 

(iii) number the new definitions and renumber the existing definitions accordingly; and 



(iv) revise the definition of "(2.1) Cutting or Removal of Trees" by deleting all language after the word 
"branches" and substituting in lieu thereof, the following: 

"(as defined herein), cutting of roots, or any other work that would otherwise compromise a tree's health, 
such as soil and/or root compaction, water deprivation, or other conditions resulting from proposed work 
along a scenic road sufficient in the opinion of the Planning Board or a certified arborist to cause eventual 
destruction of a tree. This definition does not apply to routine or emergency tree maintenance that removes 

32 



only permanently diseased or damaged limbs, trunks, roots and dead whole trees. Nor does this definition 
apply to trimming work, including cutting of major branches, by the Town's Utilities or Public Works 
Departments, provided that the Planning Board has reviewed the proposed work and determined it to be in 
accordance with good practices. However, the removal of whole, live trees by the Utilities or Public Works 
Departments is included in this definition."; and 

(v) revise the definition of "(2.2) Repair, Maintenance, Reconstruction or Paving Work" as follows: 

• add after the word "driveways" in the second sentence, the words ", bicycle paths, sidewalks or roadside 
paths,"; and 

• add, after the third sentence, the sentence "Roadside clearing of trees to provide for vehicular clearance or 
for improvements to the line-of-sight shall also be included in this definition."; and 

• add to the existing fourth sentence, after the word "sewer," the word "drainage,", and add, to the end of 
that same sentence, the words ", to the degree that they impact trees and stone walls, except as exempted 
in 2.2 above."; and 






(vi)revise the definition of "(2.3) Roads" by deleting the word "without" in the 3 rd sentence, and substituting in 
lieu thereof the words "outside of; and by adding to the end of the definition, the sentence "Trees and 
stonewalls existing on or partially within the boundary of the right-of-way shall be considered to be within the 
right-of-way."; and 

(vii)revise the definition of "(2.4) Tearing Down or Destruction of Stone Walls", 

first sentence, by adding, after "ten ( 10)", the word "total" and after the word "destruction" the words ", 
removal, covering or painting"; and 

b) Amending "PROCEDURE FOR DESIGNATING SCENIC ROADS" as follows: 

(i) add to subsection "(4.1)", 2 a sentence, after the words "Highway 

Department," the words "the Utilities Department,"; and add, after the words "Historical Commission" the words 

", all property owners with land bordering the right-of-way,"; and 

(ii) in order to reflect the changed status of Gravelly Brook Road, delete from paragraph (4.3) the words "Gravellj 
Brook Road (1989)"; and 

(iii) add to subsection "(4.3)", in the correct alphabetical sequence, the following scenic roads: 

"Linebrook Road from Howe Street to Leslie Road (2009) 

Mile Lane (2009) 

Old Right Road from Route 1 to Linebrook Road (2009) 

Paradise Road (2009) 

Plains Road (2009)"; and 

(iv) delete from paragraph "(4.3)" the words "twenty-three" and substitute in lieu thereof the words "twenty- 
seven"; and 

c) Amending "PROCEDURES" as follows: 

(i) delete, from subsection "(5.1) Filing", paragraphs "a." and "b.", substituting in lieu thereof the following: 

"a. A completed scenic road application, including two copies of a plan showing proposed work and the 
extent of alterations or removal of trees or stone walls, so that readers may locate it with reasonable 
specificity on the ground without the need for additional plats or references, and describing in reasonable 

33 



detail the proposed changes to trees and stone walls, and a statement of purpose, or purposes, for the 
proposed action. 

The plan shall be drawn at a scale of 1" = 40' or to a scale approved by the Planning Board, and shall 
show the name of the street or streets, the extent of the Scenic Road right-of-way, north arrow, names of 
abutters within one hundred ( 100) feet of the proposed work, a title block and suitable space to record the 
action of the Planning Board. 

One copy of the completed application and one copy of the plan shall also be submitted to the Town 
Clerk. 

b. Any further explanatory material useful to adequately inform the Planning Board, including 
clearly identifiable digital or printed photographs of the proposed work area and its existing 
conditions. 

c. A list of abutters to the subject property."; and 

(ii) modify subsection "(5.2) Notice" as follows: after the 2 nd sentence, add a new sentence, to read as 
follows: "The Applicant shall be responsible for the cost of advertising the public hearing; delete 
from the third sentence, after the words "of the", the words "of the"; and delete the fourth sentence 
in its entirety; and add to the end of the paragraph, the sentence "Copies of the notice shall be sent to 
the Board of Selectmen, the Tree Warden, the Public Works Department, the Utilities Department, 
the Conservation Commission and the Historical Commission before the public hearing 
commences."; and 

(iii) modify subsection "(5.4) Decision" by deleting all language and replacing with the following: 

"The Planning Board shall provide its written decision to the applicant, with copy filed with the 
Town Clerk, within seven (7) days of taking action on the application. If a consolidated meeting has 
been held involving the Tree Warden, then the Tree Warden shall issue a separate written decision 
related to the public shade trees. The Planning Board and/or the Tree Warden shall also provide copy 
of the decision to the applicant, the Historical Commission, the Tree Warden/Highway Department, 
and/or the Planning Board."; and 

(iv) add subsections "(5.5) Tree Replacement", "(5.6) Public Shade Trees", "(5.7) Statute of 
Limitations", and "(5.8) Emergency Repair" to read as follows: 

"(5.5) Tree Replacement 

If the cutting or removal of whole trees is approved by the Planning Board or Tree Warden, the 
applicant shall be required to replace the trees cut with nursery quality trees, which are of Zone 6 
hardiness at a minimum, that are native to the region, and that are acceptable to the Planning Board, 
in consultation with the Tree Warden. For every three inches of tree cut, measured across its stump, 
a nursery quality replacement tree with at least a two and one-half inch caliper, measured four feet 
from the ground, shall be planted by the applicant. The location of the replacement trees shall be at 
the direction of the Tree Warden, in consultation with the Planning Board. 

(5.6) Public Shade Trees 

When required by M.G.L. c. 87 (Shade Trees), notice shall be given and the Planning Board hearing 
required by M.G.L. c. 40, §15C (Scenic Roads) shall be held in conjunction with those held by the 

34 



Tree Warden, with the Tree Warden responsible for the consolidated notice acting under M.G.L. 
87 (Shade Trees). Consent to an action by the Planning Board shall not be construed as consent b 
the Tree Warden or vice versa. A Planning Board decision shall contain a condition that no work 
shall take place until any applicable provisions of M.G.L. c. 87 (Shade Trees) have been complie 
with. 

(5.7) Statute of Limitations 

The approval of the Planning Board or Tree Warden under these regulations for any proposed wc 
shall be valid for two years from the date the decision is filed with the Town Clerk. After two ye* 
from this date, the decision is void unless an extension is granted before the expiration. 

(5.8) Emergency Repair 

The requirements of this bylaw shall not apply when the Tree Warden acts in an emergency in 
accordance with law. In cases where a tree or branch poses a threat to public safety and there is m 
sufficient time to obtain prior approval from the Planning Board, the Planning Board shall be 
notified by the Tree Warden within the calendar week after any action which would have been a j 
violation of this bylaw if the threat had not existed. Under no circumstances are stone walls to be 
torn down or destroyed on a scenic road under the auspices of emergency repair."; and 

d) Amending "CONSIDERATIONS" by deleting all language after the words ". . .the following:" and 
substitute in lieu thereof the following: 

"a. Contribution of trees and/or stonewalls to scenic beauty; 

b. Age and historic significance of roads, trees and stone walls; 

c. Features of the road, such as surface, pavement width and bridges; 

d. Public safety; 

e. Local residential traffic patterns and overall traffic volume and congestion; 

f. Compensatory actions proposed, such as tree and stone wall replacement; 

g. Functional importance and urgency of repair, maintenance, reconstruction or paving; 

h. Additional evidence contributed by abutters, town agencies and other interested parties; 

i. Recreational uses of the road; 

j. Preservation of natural resources and historic resources; 

k. Scenic and aesthetic characteristics; 

1. Environmental values; 

m. Other planning information; 

n. Existence or absence of reasonable alternatives."; and 

e) Amending "DRIVEWAY DESIGN GUIDELINES" as follows: 

i 
(i) revise subsection "(7.4)", by adding, after the words "No tree", the words "which complies with 
subsection 5.5 of this bylaw"; and after the word "trunk", the words "within the right-of-way and"; and 

(ii) add the following four subsections: 

"(7.6) No stone wall sections with greater than one cubic foot of wall material per linear foot should b< 
removed for a driveway unless the curb cut cannot be safely located elsewhere. 

35 



(7.7) Stone removed for driveway breaches shall be used to repair other sections of the wall along the 
road, at the sole expense of the applicant. 

(7.8) Stone Walls that are breached should be provided with appropriate termini. Appropriate termini 
shall consist of a compatible material, and shall be constructed from stone removed from the wall at the 
breach when it is feasible to do so. Appropriate termini may consist of tapered ends to the stone wall that 
turn back onto the driveway, stone piers, or other designs consistent with the existing wall. 

(7.9) The use of a common driveway will be considered to be a feasible alternative to the demolition or 
removal of a stone wall for more than one driveway. To the extent that common driveways would limit 
the destruction of stone walls, they are encouraged."; and 

Amending "ENFORCEMENT" as follows: 

(i) add to the end of the first paragraph of subsection "(8.1)" the words "Unless waived, the required 
restoration shall consist of restoring the stone wall to its previously existing condition and/or replacing the 
trees cut with nursery quality trees that are acceptable to the Planning Board. For every three inches of tree 
cut, measured across the stump, a nursery quality replacement tree with a two and one-half inch caliper, 
measured four feet from the ground, shall be planted by the applicant.": and add to the end of subsection 
"(8.1)" the following paragraph: 

"Failure to comply with a duly issued decision of the Planning Board shall subject the applicant to 
restoration as detailed above and other remedial measures that the Planning Board deems necessary."; 
and 

(ii) add to subsection "(8.2)", after the words "three hundred dollars", the numerical representation 

"($300)"; and add to the end of the subsection the sentence "Each day, or portion thereof, that a violation of 
this bylaw continues without a Planning Board approved decision to take restorative action shall be deemed 
a separate offense"; and add the following two new subsections: 

"(8.3) In addition to the foregoing remedies, the Town of Ipswich, acting by and through its Planning 
Board, and with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, shall have all other legal and equitable 
remedies which may exist, including without limitation the right to seek injunctive relief. In addition, the 
Town of Ipswich may in its discretion enforce the provisions of this bylaw in the manner provided in 
M.G.L. c.40, §21D. 

(8.4) If in any aspect, any provision of this bylaw, in whole or part, shall prove to be invalid for any 
reason, such invalidity shall only affect the part of such provision found invalid. In all other aspects, all 
provisions of this bylaw shall remain in full force."; 

! derator's Declaration : Motion carried unanimously 

1 TICLE1Q RIGHT TO FARM BYLAW 

1 SEE FEBRUARY 16, 2010 LETTER FROM ATTORNEY GENERAL'S OFFICE REGARDING THEIR 
! iAPROVAL OF A PORTION OF SECTION 4. 

' lotion was made by Ms. Ingrid F. Miles, duly seconded, to: 



end the General Bylaws of the Town of Ipswich by adding a new chapter, "Chapter XIX. IPSWICH RIGHT 
FARM BYLAW", as set forth in Article 10 of the warrant for the October 19. 2009 Special Town Meeting. 



36 



Article 10 of the Warrant for the Special Town Meeting of October 19, 2009: 

"CHAPTER XIX. 
IPSWICH RIGHT TO FARM BYLAW 

Section 1. Purpose and Intent 






Agricultural production is a major contributor to the Town's economy. Agricultural lands constitute unique ;. 
irreplaceable resources of local, regional, and statewide importance. Further, both the continuation of existinj 
and the initiation of new agricultural activities preserve the landscape and environmental resources of Ipswi< j 
contribute to the increase of tourism, and further the economic welfare and self-sufficiency of the people of 1 
Ipswich. 

The purpose and intent of this bylaw is to state with emphasis the right to farm accorded to all citizens of the 
Commonwealth under amendment Article 97 of the Massachusetts Constitution and all applicable statutes ail 
regulations of the Commonwealth, including but not limited to General Laws Chapter 40A, section 3; Chapt 
90, Section 9; Chapter 111, Section 125 A; and Chapter 128, Section 1 A. 

This bylaw encourages the pursuit of agriculture, promotes agriculture-based economic opportunities, and 
protects farmlands within the Town by allowing agricultural uses and related activities to function with mini ] 
conflict with abutters and Town boards and commissions. 

Section 2. Definitions 

"Farming" or "agriculture" or their derivatives shall include, but not be limited to, the following: 

• farming in all its branches and the cultivation and tillage of the soil; 

• dairying; 

• production, cultivation, growing, and harvesting of any agricultural, aquacultural, floriculture 
viticultural, or horticultural commodities; 

• growing and harvesting of forest products upon forest land, and any other forestry or lumberi 
operations; 

• raising of livestock including horses; 

• keeping of horses; and 

• keeping and raising of poultry, cattle, swine, ratites (such as emus, ostriches and rheas) and 
camelids (such as llamas and camels), phasianids (such as pheasants and peafowl), and other 
domesticated animals for food and other agricultural purposes, including bees and fur-bearing 
animals. 

Farming activities include, but are not limited to, the following: 

• operation and transportation of slow-moving farm equipment over roads within the Town; 

• control of pests, including, but not limited to, insects, weeds, predators and disease organisms | 
plants and animals; application of manure, fertilizers and pesticides; 

• conducting agriculture-related educational and farm-based recreational activities, including a^ j 
tourism, provided that the activities are related to marketing the agricultural output or service; 
the farm; 



37 






• processing and packaging of the agricultural output of the farm and the operation of a farmer's 
market or farm stand including signage thereto: 

• maintenance, repair, or storage of seasonal equipment, or apparatus owned or leased by the farm 
owner or manager used expressly for the purpose of propagation, processing, management, or 
sale of agricultural products; 

• on-site production of fuel or power from agricultural products or wastes principally produced on 
the farm; and 

• on-farm relocation of earth and the clearing of ground for farming operations. 

tion 3. Right to Farm Declaration 

! right to farm is hereby recognized to exist within the Town of Ipswich. The above-described activities may 
ur on holidays, weekdays, and weekends by night or day and shall include the attendant incidental noise, 
rs, dust, and fumes associated with generally accepted agricultural practices. The benefits and protections of 
bylaw are intended to apply to those agricultural and farming operations and activities conducted in 
jrdance with generally accepted agricultural practices. (Generally accepted agricultural practices include, 
, are not limited to, best management practices. Guidance on current best management practices can be 
lined from the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Natural Resource Conservation Service, the Massachusetts 
7i Bureau, the University of Massachusetts Extension program, the Massachusetts Department of 
icultural Resources, or from other recognized agricultural institutions.) Moreover, nothing in this bylaw 
1 be deemed as acquiring any interest in land. The protections contained in this bylaw do not impose or 
:mpt any land use or other restrictions associated with agricultural operations, which are properly the subject 
tate statute, regulation, zoning, or other local bylaws, including the Ipswich Wetlands Protective Bylaw. 

i ion 4. Notification to Real Estate Buyers 

i rder to allow prospective purchasers to make informed decisions prior to a real estate transaction and to 
[ note harmony between farmers and their new neighbors after a transaction, the Town of Ipswich requests 
' selling landholders and/or their agents and assigns provide written notice to prospective purchasers 
i tantially as follows: 

1 'It is the policy of Ipswich to conserve, protect and encourage the maintenance and improvement of 
lgricultural land for the production of food, or other agricultural products, and also for its natural and 
ecological value. This disclosure notification is to inform buyers or occupants that the property they are 
ibout to acquire or occupy lies within a town where farming activities occur. Such farming activities may 
nclude, but are not limited to, activities that may cause noise, dust or odors. Purchasing, and henceforth 
)ccupying land within Ipswich means that one should expect and accept such conditions as a norm and 
lecessary aspect of living in Ipswich." 

V ten notification may occur in one of several ways, including, but not limited to. a disclosure form or an 
c ndum to a Purchase and Sale Agreement, and should include an acknowledgment by the buyer that they 
i received notification. 

^ in 30 days after this bylaw becomes effective, the following shall occur: 

The Town, through the Offices of the Town Manager and Town Clerk, shall make available for use by 
selling landowners and/or their agents and assigns, copies of sample written notifications, including a 
disclosure notification form. 



38 



• The Town shall prominently place the above-stated policy disclosure in one or more locations in tow 
hall. 

• The Tax Collector shall include a copy of the disclosure notification form with all responses to reque 
for Municipal Lien Certificates. 

Section 5. Resolution of Disputes 

To enhance the prompt resolution of disputes that may arise between those engaged in the agricultural uses 
protected under this Bylaw and those who claim that the use or enjoyment of their properties is adversely 
affected by such uses, the following dispute resolution procedure is established as a means by which owners 
tenants may attempt to resolve the dispute in a prompt, effective, and amicable manner. 

Any person who wishes to complain that the operation of a farm is creating a substantial adverse effect on 
health, safety, or welfare, or is creating a noxious and significant interference with the use or enjoyment of ti 
real property may, notwithstanding pursuance of any other available remedy, request resolution assistance ft 
the Board of Selectmen, the Zoning Enforcement Officer, or the Board of Health, depending on the nature o I 
the request. The filing of a request for resolution assistance does not suspend the time within which to pursi 
any other available remedies that the complainant may have. The Board of Selectmen, Zoning Enforcement 
Officer, or Board of Health shall forward a copy of the request to the Agricultural Commission, which shall i 
review the request, and report its recommendations to the referring town officials within an agreed upon tim 
frame. 

Section 6. Severability Clause 

If any part of this bylaw is for any reason held to be unconstitutional or invalid, such determination shall noi 
affect the remainder of this bylaw. The Town of Ipswich hereby declares the provisions of this bylaw to be 
severable."; 

Moderators Declaration: Motion carried unanimously 

ARTICLE 11 SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT MEASURES 

A motion was made by Mr. Timothy A. Purinton, duly seconded, to: 

Amend the Protective Zoning Bylaw of the Town of Ipswich as set forth in Article 1 1 of the warrant for the 
October 19. 2009 Special Town Meeting. 

Article 11 of the Warrant for the Special Town Meeting of October 19, 2009: 

1) Amending Section "11. APPLICABILITY ", "C. Municipal Construction Projects" by adding, after the sec 
sentence, the following: "All municipal construction projects, including additions to existing public 
buildings, that create 2,500 square feet or more of new building area, shall be certifiable under the U.S. 
Green Building Council's most current applicable LEED® Certified standards for design and constructic 
unless the Board of Selectmen determines that meeting the LEED® standard will be economically infeasi 
based on a cost analysis and the projected cost savings, including operations."; and 

(2) Amending Section "III. DEFINITIONS " by adding, in the correct alphabetical sequence, definitions of 
"LEED®'', LOW IMPACT DEVELOPMENT, and "U.S. GREEN BUILDING COUNCIL", said 
definitions to read as follows: 

39 



"LEED®: An acronym for Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design, a nationally accepted Green 
Building Rating System™ for green buildings developed by the U.S. Green Building Council. LEED® 
standards vary based on project type and projects are rated at four levels: Certified, Silver, Gold, and 
Platinum."; and 

'LOW IMPACT DEVELOPMENT (LID): An approach to development designed to manage 
precipitation at the source through the use of uniformly distributed, decentralized, micro-scale controls. The 
goal of LID is to mimic a site's predevelopment hydrology by using design techniques that infiltrate, filter, 
>tore, evaporate, and detain runoff close to its source."; and 

'U.S. GREEN BUILDING COUNCIL (USGBC): A national nonprofit membership organization 
:omprised of leaders from the building industry, formed to encourage sustainability by promoting buildings 
hat are environmentally responsible, profitable, and healthy places to live and work. USGBC promulgated 
he LEED® Green Building Rating System™"; and 

Amending Section "VI. E. Screening Requirements", first paragraph, by adding after the third sentence, 
vhich ends in "...along the district boundary.", the following sentence: "Low impact development 
ntegrated stormwater management practices, such as bioretention cells and vegetated swales, may be 
ocated within the vegetative screening setback areas, provided they are done so in a manner that does not 
)revent the screening from meeting the objective of providing a year-round vegetated buffer between 
>roperties."; and 

Amending Section "VII. OFF-STREET PARKING AND LOADING REQUIREMENTS " as follows: 

.. Revise "B. Table of Minimum Parking Requirements", footnote "**", by deleting the words "twenty- 
five (25%) percent" and substituting in lieu thereof "fifty (50%) percent"; and 

Revise "G. Mixed Use Facilities", second sentence, by deleting all language after the word "facility,"; 
substitute, in lieu thereof, the following: 

"parking for two (2) or more buildings or uses may be provided in combined parking areas where such 
areas will continue to be available for the several buildings or uses, provided that the total number of 
spaces is not less than the sum of the spaces required for each use individually, except that said number 
of spaces may be reduced by up to one-half ( 1/2) such sum if it can be demonstrated that the hours or 
days of peak parking for the uses are so different that a lower total will be adequate for all uses served 
by the facility."; and 

Revise "K. Design Standards for Parking Facilities" as follows: 

i. delete the final two sentences, substituting in lieu thereof the following: 

"Compact spaces may account for up to thirty (30%) percent of the total spaces in a lot. The 
layout of standard and compact spaces and aisles should be done in such a way so that the 
smallest feasible paved parking area results. All compact spaces shall be clearly marked."; and 

it delete the existing "Design Standards for Parking Facilities" table, substituting in lieu thereof the 
following table: 



40 



Parking 
Angle 

(A) 


Stall Width (B)** 


Stall Depth (C)*** 


Aisle Width (D) 


Curb Length (E) 


Standard 


Compact 


Standard 


Compact 


1-way 


2-way 


Standard 


Compact 


0° 


8'-6" 


7'-6" 


N/A 


N/A 


12'-0" 


20' -0" 


22'-0" 


20'-0" 


30° 


8'-6" 


T -6" 


17'-0" 


15'-0" 


ll'-O" 


N/A 


17'-0" 


15*-0" 


45° 


8'-6" 


7'-6" 


17'-0" 


15' -0" 


13'-0" 


N/A 


12'-0" 


10'-7" 


60° 


8'-6" 


7'-6" 


17'-0" 


15'-0" 


16'-0" 


N/A 


9'-6" 


8'-8" 


70° 


8'-6" 


T -6" 


17'-0" 


15' -0" 


17'-0" 


N/A 


9'-l" 


8'-0" 


80° 


8'-6" 


7'-6" 


17'-0" 


15'-0" 


18'-0" 


N/A 


8'-8" 


T-T 


90° 


8'-6" 


7'-6" 


17'-0" 


15'-0" 


18'-0" 


22'-0" 


8'-6" 


T-6" 



d. Revise "O. Surfacing, Draining and Curbing" by inserting, after the first sentence of the first paraj f 
the following sentences: 

"To reduce stormwater discharge and improve the attenuation of pollutants, low impact developm 
integrated stormwater management practices, to the extent feasible, shall be incorporated into pari i 
facilities of twenty (20) or more spaces. Techniques that limit the overall impervious coverage of; 
parking facility, such as replacement of bituminous concrete with pervious pavers or porous aspha i 
strongly encouraged where appropriate."; and 

e. Revise "P. Landscaping" by adding, after the fifth sentence, the following sentences: 

"At least ten (10%) percent of the internal area of a paved parking facility, exclusive of perimeter 
landscaping, shall be planted with landscaped island areas. To the extent feasible, landscaping ma k 
used in islands or in the perimeter areas of parking lots shall be drought resistant and salt tolerant i 
invasive species, and such areas shall be designed to receive and accommodate runoff."; and 

(5) Amending Section "IX. A. Open Space Preservation Zoning" as follows: 

a. Revise "Subsection 6. Common Driveways" as follows: 

i. revise the first sentence, by changing "may be" to "are"; and 

//. in paragraph "a.", delete the phrase "a. The common driveway shall satisfy one of th 

following conditions:", and substitute in lieu thereof the following: "If any of the following 
conditions are met, applicants are encouraged to construct common driveways, provided tht n 
meet conditions a. through g. of this section."; and 



///. 



IV. 



relocate that new phrase and the remaining language of "a." to the end of 
final lettered paragraph; and 



Section 6, aft h 



revise standard "(1)" of paragraph "e." by deleting the word minimum and substituting in li 
thereof the following: 

", except for driveways serving two (2) lots, in which case the width may be a minim < 
twelve (12) feet. The Planning Board may allow driveways serving up to five (5) lots fc 
less than sixteen (16) feet in width if turnouts are provided in a satisfactory manner." c 

delete the letter "h." and add the text of current paragraph "h." the end of paragraph "g."; i 



41 



vi. re-letter existing paragraphs "b." through "i." (including amended paragraphs above) 
appropriately so that they become paragraphs "a." through "g."; and 

(6) Amending Section "X. SITE PLAN REVIEW " as follows: 

a. Revise "Subsection C. General Standards", standard "5.", by adding, after the words, "on-site 
absorption", the following: ", and low impact development integrated stormwater management 
practices"; and 

b. Revise "Subsection E. Submission Requirements", paragraph "2.", subparagraph "1.", number "(3)", 
by adding, after the word "swales", the following: "and other low impact development integrated 
stormwater management facilities"; and 

c. Revise "Subsection J. Maintenance", by adding, after the word "drainage", the words ", low impact 
development integrated stormwater management facilities"; and 

d. Revise "Subsection L. Site Landscaping" as follows: 

i. add, after the words, "Section VI. E.", the words "and Section VII. P."; and 

/'/.delete all language after "non-invasive drought tolerant plants" and substitute in lieu thereof, the 
following: ", as well as with salt tolerant species where exposed to run-off from parking lots and 
driveways, so as to promote on-site infiltration of stormwater run-off, and to reduce irrigation, 
heating, and cooling needs"; 

; lerator's Declaration: Motion carried unanimously 

t riCLE12 MISCELLANEOUS ZONING CHANGES 

^ otion was made by Ms. Cathryn M. Chadwick, duly seconded, to: 

^ nd the Protective Zoning Bylaw of the Town of Ipswich as set forth in Article 12 of the warrant for the 
) ber 19, 2009 Special Town Meeting, with the following amendments: 

)• te "(2) h." of the article in its entirety; and 

I nd "(3) f." of the article by deleting footnote "31." in its entirety and substituting in lieu thereof the 
o ving: "31. RESERVED" 

\f le 12 of the Warrant for the Special Town Meeting of October 19, 2009: 

mending Section "III. DEFINITIONS" as follows: 

add, in the correct alphabetical sequence, a definition of "FILLING STATION", said definition to read 
as follows: 

"FILLING STATION: An establishment which primarily sells automotive motor fuels, lubricants and 
accessory items, but which also may sell a limited range of convenience goods, as well as servicing and 
minor repairs of motor vehicles."; and 

revise the definition of "MULTI-FAMILY RESIDENTIAL DEVELOPMENT" by adding to the end of 
the existing definition, the following: ", or (c) two (2) or more two-family dwellings"; and revise the 

42 



definition of "GUEST HOUSE, PRIVATE" by adding, after the words "accessory residential building" 
the words "with plumbing"; and 

(2) Amending Section "V.D. Table of Use Regulations" as follows: 

a. under the Community Facilities heading, delete the principal use "Sale of farm, horticultural, and 
nursery products on a wholesale or retail basis"; and 

b. under the Commercial heading, add the following principal uses: 

i. "Sale of agricultural, aquacultural, silvicultural, horticultural, floricultural, or viticultural 

products, on a wholesale or retail basis, on less than five (5) acres"; and maintain the same use 
allowances and prohibitions as designated for "Sale of farm, horticultural, and nursery products 
on a wholesale or retail basis"; and 

ii. "Sale of agricultural, aquacultural, silvicultural, horticultural, floricultural, or viticultural 

products, on a wholesale or retail basis, on five (5) acres or more"; and insert "P 7 " under the 
columns for each district; and 

c. under Community Facilities, delete the principal use, "Gardens, orchards, nurseries, and silviculture":) 
substitute in lieu thereof, under the Commercial heading, the principal use "Greenhouses, gardens, 
orchards, nurseries, silviculture, viticulture, and aquaculture" and maintain the same allowances as 
designated for "Gardens, orchards, nurseries, and silviculture"; and 

d. under Community Facilities, delete the following principal uses: 

i. "Greenhouses and farms, including the raising, keeping, slaughter, and dressing of livestock oi 

other farm animals on five (5) acres or more"; and 

ii. " on less than five (5) acres"; and 

Assign the allowances and prohibitions associated with those uses to the following two new uses, 
respectively, to be listed under the heading "Commercial", except for the latter use, under the use 
column for the "RRC" District, change "-" to "SBA": 

i. "Keeping, raising, and breeding of farm animals, such as poultry, horses, livestock or other fan 

animals, or insects on five (5) acres or more"; and 

ii. "Keeping, raising, and breeding of farm animals, such as poultry, horses, livestock or other fan 
animals, or insects on less than five (5) acres"; and 

e. under the Commercial heading, delete the principal use "The following uses, if commercial: kennel, 

stable, livery stable, riding academy, or veterinary hospital"; substitute in lieu thereof, "Kennel, 
stable, livery stable or riding academy"; add a footnote to each allowance so that it reads, "SBA 5,2 
and maintain the same allowances and prohibitions as apply to the existing use; and 

f. under the Commercial heading, add the principal use "Veterinary Hospital"; and insert "SBA 5 " under 
the columns for each district; and 



43 



g. under the Residential heading, for the principal uses "Two-family dwelling", "Multi -family dwelling" 
and "Multi -family residential development", add footnote "30"; and 

h. under the Residential heading, for the principal uses "Single-family detached dwelling" and "Multi- 
family residential development", add footnote "31"; and 

i. under the Commercial heading, add the principal use "Filling Station", and for said use, insert "SPB" 
under the use columns for the "GB, HB, PC and I" Districts; and insert "-" under the use columns for all 
other Districts; and 

j. under the Commercial heading, for the principal use "Retail establishment selling principally 

convenience goods including but not limited to: food, drugs & proprietary goods", add footnote "34" to 
each of the allowances under the district columns; and 

k. for the accessory use "Child care facilities", under the "GB, CB, HB, I, and LI" District columns, 
change "-" to "P 2 "; and 

1. delete the words "Private guesthouse," from the accessory use beginning with the words "Private 

guesthouse, tool shed, playhouse, tennis court ", and add it as a separate accessory use; insert "SBA" 

under the district columns for the "RRA, RRB, RRC, IR, GB, CB, HB, and I" Districts, and insert "-" 
under the columns for all other Districts; and 

m. delete the accessory use, "Gardens, orchards, nurseries, or silviculture"; substitute in lieu thereof, 

"Gardens, greenhouses, orchards, nurseries, silviculture, viticulture, or aquaculture"; maintain the same 
allowances and prohibitions as apply to the existing use, but add footnote "33" under each district 
column for that use; and 

n. add the accessory use, "Formula fast food establishments which provide seating for at least sixteen 
persons within the building"; insert "SPB21" under the district column for the "CB" District, and insert 
"-" under the columns for all other Districts; and 

o. for the accessory use "Keeping, raising, and breeding of farm animals, such as poultry, horses, livestock 
or other farm animals, or insects for use only by residents of the premises on one (1) acre or more", add 
footnote "32" to the end of the use description and to the allowances and prohibitions under the "CB", 
"PC", and "LI" district columns so that they read "SBA 32 ", " - 32 ", and " - 32 ", respectively; and 

3) Amending Section "V.D Footnotes to Table of Use Regulations" as follows: 

a. revise Footnote "2", as follows: 

i. delete "G.L. Ch. 28A, Section 9" and substitute in lieu thereof "G.L. Ch. 15D, Section 1 A"; and 

ii. delete the words "footnote 19 below" and substitute in lieu thereof "footnote 17 to the Table of 
Dimensional and Density Regulations in Section VLB. of this bylaw"; and 

b. revise Footnote "4." by deleting the words, "Sale of farm, horticultural and nursery products, on a 
wholesale or retail basis," and by deleting the words, "more than one story or twenty (20) feet in height, 
or"; and substituting in lieu thereof the words "or buildings"; and 



44 



c. amend Footnote "7.", by deleting the word "RESERVED", and substituting in lieu thereof the 
following: 

"Provided that either during the months of June, July, August and September of each year or during 
the harvest season of the primary crop raised on land of the owner or lessee, twenty five (25%) 
percent of such products for sale, based on either gross sales dollars or volume, have been producec 
by the owner or lessee of the land on which the facility is located, or at least twenty five (25%) 
percent of such products for sale, based on either gross annual sales or annual volume, have been 
produced by the owner or lessee of the land on which the facility is located and at least an additions 
fifty (50%) percent of such products for sale, based upon either gross annual sales or annual volurrn 
have been produced on Massachusetts land used for the primary purpose of commercial agriculture 
aquaculture, silviculture, horticulture, floriculture or viticulture, whether by the owner or lessee of 
the land on which the facility is located or by another, except that all such activities shall be limited 
to parcels of 5 acres or more in area not zoned for agriculture, aquaculture, silviculture, horticulture 
floriculture or viticulture (G.L. Ch. 40A, Section 3). If the above requirements cannot be satisfied, 
the use may be allowed only by special permit of the Zoning Board of Appeals."; and 

d. add Footnote "29.", to read as follows: 

"29. If located on five (5) acres or more, and provided that the breeding, boarding, grooming, and 

training of dogs is strictly limited to dogs owned by the owner/lessee of the land on which the ! 
facility is located, (with an exception for the temporary boarding of breeding stock not owned I 
the owner/lessee of the land, but used for breeding with dogs owned by the owner/lessee of the 
land), then the use is allowed by right."; and 

e. add Footnote "30.", to read as follows: 

"30. Any expansion of or alteration to an existing two-family dwelling, a multi-family dwelling, or 
multi-family residential development, whether said use is conforming or non-conforming, whi( 
creates one (1) or more additional residential dwelling units, shall require a special permit fron 
the Planning Board."; and 

f. add Footnote "31", to read as follows: 

"31. No building permit that would create more than one kitchen in a dwelling unit will be issued 
until the owner has recorded a restrictive covenant at the Essex County South Registry of Deec 
The covenant shall state: "Occupancy of a single-family dwelling with more than one kitchen 
shall be limited to occupancy by an individual, by a group of persons related either by marriag* 
by blood within the second degree of kinship and/or by adoption, or by a group of no more tha 
four (4) unrelated individuals, residing cooperatively in one dwelling unit." The restrictive 
covenant would not apply to a single-family dwelling with an accessory apartment that has bee 
legally established by a special permit from the Zoning Board of Appeals, so long as the 
principal and accessory dwelling units contain no more than one kitchen per unit."; and 

g. add Footnote "32", said footnote to read as follows: 

"32. Except that for properties of five (5) acres or more, the keeping, raising and breeding of farm 

animals and insects is permitted, as is the sale of agricultural products, pursuant to the conditio 
of footnote 7 above .."; and 

45 



h. add Footnote "33", said footnote to read as follows: 

"33. For properties of five (5) acres or more, the sale of agricultural products from these uses is 
permitted, pursuant to the conditions of footnote 7 above."; and 

i. add Footnote "34", said footnote to read as follows: 

"34. Retail establishments may also sell automotive fuels, lubricants and accessory items, including 
the sale of gasoline at pumps, but the latter only by special permit from the Planning Board, and 
only in the GB, HB, PC and I Districts."; and 

(4) Amending Section "VLB. Table of Dimensional and Density Regulations" as follows: 

a. add Footnote "2." to the "Front" column heading under heading "Minimum Setbacks" in both the 
Accessory and Principal tables so that it reads, "Front u ' 7 (foot)"; 

b. delete the existing minimum rear setback requirement, "25", for all uses in the Highway Business (HB) 
District, and substitute in lieu thereof, the requirement, "30"; 

c. add the words, "PRINCIPAL BUILDINGS AND STRUCTURES" to the top of the existing principal 
dimensional table heading, above the words "TABLE OF DIMENSIONAL AND DENSITY 

REGULATIONS" and in the same location where the table is continued on other pages; 

d. add the words, "and Structures" to the existing Accessory Buildings table heading, after the word, 
"Buildings", and capitalize the words in the new heading; 

e. amend the "Footnotes to Table of Dimensional and Density Regulations" by revising Footnote "2." as 
follows: 

i. delete the words ", and the front setback requirement up to a maximum of 10%.", substituting in 

lieu thereof the words ". The Board may reduce by special permit the front setback requirement 
for all buildings and structures up to a maximum of 10%, except for accessory buildings or 
structures exceeding one hundred and fifty (150) square feet in area or one (1) story in height."; 
and 

5) Amending Section "VI.F. Requirements for Accessory Buildings and Structures", first paragraph, as 

follows: 

a. add, to the second sentence, after the words ", that an accessory building", the words "or structure"; 

b. delete the first, fourth, and fifth sentences in their entirety; 

c. add, to the beginning of the paragraph, the following: 

"An accessory building or structure may be located in accordance with the Table of Dimensional and 
Density Regulations (Accessory Buildings and Structures) and Footnote 2 to said table."; and 

6) Amending Section "VII.B. Table of Minimum Parking Requirements" as follows: 

a. under the Community Facilities heading, delete the use, "Gardens, orchards, nurseries, silviculture, 
greenhouses, farms, including the sale of farm, horticulture and nursery products on a wholesale or retail 

46 



basis", substituting in lieu thereof, under the Commercial Uses heading, "Gardens, greenhouses, 
orchards, nurseries, silviculture, viticulture, aquaculture, and farms, including the sale of products frod 
such uses on a wholesale or retail basis", and maintain the same parking spaces required; and 

b. relocate the Community Facilities use, "Kennel, stable, livery stable, riding academy or veterinary 
hospital", to the Commercial Uses heading and maintain the same parking spaces required; and 

(7) Amending Section "VIII. D. Sign Requirements per Zoning District", Paragraph "1.", subsection "f", as 

follows: 

a. add, after the word "subdivision", the words ", Great Estate Preservation Development, Green Space 
Preservation Development,"; and add, after the words "multi-family" the word "residential"; and 

b. delete the words "The top of the sign shall be no higher than four (4) feet above grade."; and 

(8) Amending Section "IX.SPECIAL REGULATIONS" as follows: 

a. revise Subsection "C. Water Supply Protection Districts", paragraph "7.d.", by adding, after the words 
"are permitted", the words "on that portion of any property located"; and 

b. revise Subsection "E. Common Driveways", paragraph "2", by deleting from the first sentence the 
words "public way", and substituting in lieu thereof the word "street"; 

c. revise Subsection "J. Accessory Apartment", paragraph "2.j.", by deleting the words "in-law"; 

d. revise subsection "O. Green Space Preservation District" by adding to the subsection title, the word 
"Development", after the word "Preservation"; 

Moderator's Declaration: Motion carried unanimously 

ARTICLE 13 PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION COMMITTEE 

A motion was made by Mr. Charles D. Surpitski to: 

Rename the Commuter Rail Committee to the Public Transportation Committee, said Committee to have 
broader responsibilities involving various forms of public transportation serving the town of Ipswich. 

An amended motion was made by Ms. Dorcas K. Rice, and duly seconded to: 

Indefinitely postpone the article. 

Moderator's Declaration: Amended motion passed. 

Moderator's call for a vote to continue the meeting after 11:00 p.m. carried unanimously. 

ARTICLE 14 STORMWATER REVOLVING FUND 

A motion was made by Mr. Raymond K. Morley, duly seconded, to: 

Authorize for FY' 10 a Stormwater Revolving Fund, established under Massachusetts General Laws ChapK 
44, Section 53E!/2, the source of said Fund to be fees for permits and inspections collected pursuant to the 

47 



tormwater Management Bylaw; the use of said Fund to pay for costs related to tne permitting processes under 
le Bylaw, and to determine that no more than $50,000 may be expended by the Department of Public Works as 
ermit granting authority from monies transferred into said Fund during FY' 10. 

ui amended motion was made by Ms. Janis A. Clements-Skelton, duly seconded to: 

idefinitely postpone this article. 

unended motion was declared a negative vote by the Moderator. 

loderator's Declaration: Main motion carried by a voice vote 

ARTICLE 15 OPEN SPACE PARCELS LIST 

i motion was made by Mr. Charles D. Surpitski, and duly seconded, to: 

idd to the Open Space Parcels List, (as referenced in Article 18 of the Warrant for the April 3, 2000 Annual 
own Meeting): 

Land now or formerly owned by Arthur M. Harrington, Jr. consisting of approximately 0.122 
acres located at 27 Water Street in Ipswich, Massachusetts, identified on the Town of Ipswich 
Assessor's Map as Parcel 091 A on Map 3 ID. 

aderator's Declaration: Motion carried by a voice vote 

iTICLE 16 RECONSIDERATION 

motion was made by Mr. Patrick J. McNally, and duly seconded, to: 

lefinitely postpone this article. 

3derator's Declaration: Motion carried unanimously 

meting adjourned at 1 1:35 p.m. 

spectfully submitted, 

nela Z. Carakatsane, CMMC, CMC 
wn Clerk 



48 



BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

Patrick J. McNally, Chairman 

The past year. May 2009 through April 2010, was a year of celebration and "fine-tuning" for the Ipswich Boa 
of Selectmen. Ipswich celebrated its 375 th Anniversary with wonderful dances, a grand parade, Town picnic, 
and many other commemorative events. Many people made the 375 th celebration possible, but we especially 
thank Nat Pulsifer for being a visionary of a celebration dream that he made a reality. This was also a year 
where the Board of Selectmen fine-tuned and improved existing programs, systems, and efforts. 

In a year of limited resources (money), the Board of Selectmen searched for ways to improve Town services | 
while saving money. The Pavement Management Program is an example— instead of waiting for roads and 
streets to deteriorate to a point where full replacement is necessary, the Selectmen instituted a program to pate; 
and repair roadways before full replacement becomes the only option. We also, with the assistance of the Sol! 
Waste Advisory Committee, instituted a trash program where recyclables do not have to be separated, and 
where households are allowed to place two barrels per week curbside (one barrel beginning July 1, 2010). 
Competitive bids have just reduced our disposal costs for trash by $30.00 per ton, and we anticipate a reductk 
when bids are returned for the collection of trash. These initiatives (pavement and trash) saved significant 
money. In addition, the Town Manager recently negotiated a new contract with our ambulance service where 
the Town will pay nothing for that service, a savings of $175,000 in the first year. 

Town employees deserve great credit for understanding the difficult financial condition of the Town. By 
agreeing to "freeze" their contracts, municipal employees helped to ensure that no layoffs took place during t! 
past year. In addition, management and employees of the Town continued discussions to reduce the cost of 
health benefits to both employees and the Town— and, we continue to attempt to reduce costs by competitive j 
bidding a variety of service contracts as their terms expire. And, the Town Manager's efforts to reform the 
Essex Regional Retirement Board, while not immediately earning or saving money, has helped to begin the 
restoration of confidence in that institution. 

On the energy front, the Town's first wind turbine project's completion is on the horizon. We thought it wou i 
be operating now, but the projected date is now for the summer of 2010. In addition, the Town has gained a 
grant to install a solar collection array on the Town Hall roof. Both of these "green" projects represent the 
future of sustainability for Ipswich. To save energy, the Town continued efforts to tighten our buildings with 
new windows (Town Hall and Police Station), and new heating units (Library and Fire Station). 

While Ipswich's winter did not demand record expenditures for snow and ice removal, we were not so lucky 
when it came to heavy winds, rain and flooding. The March 2010 wind and rains seemed interminable, and 
many homes suffered power outages and flooding of basements. The downtown, along South Main and Marl 
Streets, was flooded by the Ipswich River that rose almost as high as the Mother's Day flood of 2006. We 
thank our public safety and utilities personnel for quick and effective action to restore services to the Town. v 
are now applying for State and Federal aid to counter balance our expenses for public safety and cleanup. 

The Selectmen's efforts to secure quiet zone status (silencing of train horns) for Ipswich is nearly complete. 
Our plan and design has been approved, and we will complete grade crossing improvements this spring to 
ensure that the train horns will no longer shatter the tranquility of Ipswich and that public safety is improved. : 
Also in the area of public safety, the Board of Selectmen considered joining the Central Dispatch initiative, 
which would abolish local dispatching of public safety vehicles and personnel, but decided that it was not 
appropriate for Ipswich at this time. Instead, the Selectmen will assess the success of Central Dispatch as it is 
implemented in other towns, and discuss this further (most likely in two years). 



49 



i- 



iswich's most valuable "harvest"— clams— received much attention this year. The Shellfish Advisor}' 
ommittee continues to discuss aquaculture. We expect that the Board of Selectmen will decide during the 
)ming year whether aquaculture is appropriate for Ipswich, and whether there should be public, private, or 
)th types of aquaculture. 

tie Board of Selectmen continued to support Ipswich's goal to remain a small town with wonderful open 
laces and recreation facilities. The Maplecroft Farm project, between Essex Road and Argilla Road, is almost 
nished. This open space effort, in concert with the Trust for Public Lands, the Commonwealth of 
[assachusetts, and others, will protect approximately 250 acres from development, and ensure that farming and 
restock production continues in Ipswich. In addition, the long-awaited replacement of the playground 
juipment at Bialek Park on Linebrook is complete, and is being fully used by our children. 

tie legal issues surrounding Little Neck and the Feoffees of Little Neck took much of the Board of Selectmen's 
ne— especially the three Selectmen (McNally, Kilcoyne. and Miles) who. by the terms of the Trust, serve as 
coffees. There are two active court cases (Superior Court and Probate Court) which have cost all parties. 
eluding the Town, much for attorney fees. The Board of Selectmen Feoffees hope that both cases will be 
solved during the next year, but we hoped the same thing last year. 

: hile we gained a new Selectman last year (Ray Morley), a number of key personnel retired, including Gavin 
eenan (Police Chief), Robert Gravino (Director of Public Works), Arnold "Pick" Thistlewood (Shellfish 
onstable), Willard Maker (former Fire Chief), and others. We thank them and all of the Town's employees for 
eir service. In addition, Selectmen Elizabeth Kilcoyne and Ingrid Miles decided not to run for a third term 
is year. I, personally, and the Board of Selectmen overall, will miss them. Both are thoughtful, hard-working 
intributors to the Board of Selectmen and the Town. 

tie Board of Selectmen looks forward to Fiscal Year 201 1 , and we hope you will participate with us in our 
forts to maintain and improve services to the Town of Ipswich. If you cannot attend our meetings in person. 
atch the meetings on Cable TV— the picture and sound quality is greatly improved!!! Thanks to the residents 
'Ipswich, Robert Markel (Town Manager), and Jennifer Breaker (Administrative Assistant to the Town 
lanager and Board of Selectmen) for their support, and thanks to my colleagues on the Board of Selectmen: 
lizabeth Kilcoyne, Ingrid Miles, Raymond Morley, and Charles Surpitski. 



%: % % % 4z %: % :£ 



[NANCE COMMITTEE 

imie M. Fay, Chairman 

arry E. Seidler, Vice Chairman 

tie mission of the town of Ipswich is to provide an exceptional quality of life for its citizens. We believe this is 
:hieved by providing strong schools, safe streets, quality human services and a well-maintained town 
frastructure. With town revenues growing by a modest .5% this year, both the school and municipal budgets 
ere faced with considerable challenges and significant choices. 

7 ith the slowing of the economy, new real estate growth in Ipswich slowed, mirroring the state trend. This is 
gnificant because the Town's revenue is delivered through two main sources; local taxes and fees, which 
presents 85% of our annual revenue and state revenue disbursements, which provide the remaining 15% of 
ir revenues. Therefore, as the economy slows so too does our ability to increase operating revenue. 



50 



This trend towards modest budget increase has required the town to budget conservatively and conduct a 
comprehensive examination of all expenses in an effort to reduce costs wherever practical. While we fully 
support this approach, the Finance Committee expects that future year's revenue growth will continue to 
stagnate or decline hence not keep pace with staff salaries, benefits, the demand for new and expanded service 
and sustained capital spending. As such, these business examinations will likely be an annual requirement. 

Despite our challenging financial situation and conservative budget approach, Ipswich continues to provide thj 
services you have come to rely upon while investing in infrastructure improvements and protection of our 
natural treasures. This commitment to growth during financially precarious times enhances the daily experieni 
of our residents while attracting both business and tourism, which will in turn support our revenue stream. To I 
this end, the Town has completed design plans to revitalize the downtown area and historic North Green, and 
the fall our Open Space initiative invested over $2M to restrict future development of the Maplecroft Farm, 
thereby protecting and preserving its natural beauty. 

Ipswich Public Schools continued to attract and retain residents by providing an inclusive, quality educational 
experience for our children. While all academic measurements have flaws, the Finance Committee feels that t] 
Ipswich residents with or without students in the school system should have some means of identifying their 
school districts' educational quality. In 2009, Ipswich High School experienced 90% of our children being 
accepted into four and two year college programs upon graduation, while the Ipswich School district perform* 
in the top one-third in the state on the MCAS (a required state-wide exam). Additionally, Ipswich Athletic ant 
Arts and Music programs continue to build upon past awards. 

As in 2008, the Finance Committee remains steadfast in its commitment to working with both boards to ensuij 
that the school children of Ipswich benefit fully and completely from the Feoffees of the Grammar School tru j 

The Finance Committee is grateful for the opportunity to work with the Board of Selectmen and School 
Committee in serving the residents of Ipswich. The 2009 Finance Committee consists of: Janice Clements- 
Skelton, William Craft, Jamie Fay, Richard Howard, Michael Schaaf, Larry Seidler, Marion Swan, Robert 
White and Todd Wilson. 

TOWN MANAGER 

Robert T. Markel, PhD. 

The principal challenge for Town officials in 2009 was to maintain quality services to residents and businesse \ 
while coping with the deepest economic recession since the Great Depression. The revenue base for the town I 
and the state continued to erode until the last two months of 2009 when state tax collections began to increase 
Year end gains in state revenue permitted the Commonwealth to avoid the expected mid-year reductions in aid 
to cities and towns. 

Town government operated with the same level of funding in fiscal years 2009 and 2010. There were no 
service reductions, layoffs or building closures and no new contracts or increases for management and 
unionized employees within the organization. With revenue extremely constrained, the Town Manager and j 
Selectmen focused their attention on improving efficiency and squeezing out unnecessary costs. 

Highlights of 2009 include initiatives in energy conservation and regional cooperation. Town officials worker 
with Hamilton and Wenham on a joint contract for trash disposal and recycling, including an option for 
recycling organic wastes. There were continuing and partially successful efforts to regionalize ambulance/EMj 
services among communities in central Essex County. The proposed regionalization of emergency dispatch 
operations brought controversy and a vote by the Board of Selectmen to postpone a decision until the Region; 
Emergency Communications Center is constructed and successfully underway. 

51 



lergy conservation efforts include a three year program to replace the old and drafty windows at Town Hall 
,d changing out the inefficient heating systems at the Library and Fire Department. The Town was awarded a 
ant of $150,000 from the Green Communities Program to install a solar application on the roof of Town Hall 
rtich will supply 35% of the electricity required to operate the building. The Ipswich Municipal Electric 
apartment continued its broad based effort to promote conservation by businesses and residents with a 
ogram of free energy audits and distribution of free, energy saving light bulbs. 

2009, the Selectmen mandated a new approach to street improvements which incorporates sidewalk 
lprovements, permanent crosswalks and lanes for cyclists whenever street reconstruction is undertaken. The 
apartment of Public Works presented a new "pavement management program" intended to bring a major 
(grade in the condition of the Town's street system over the next ten years. The town has not been able to 
lplement the pavement management program for lack of funding, but the Selectmen and Town Manager have 
termined that improving the condition of the Town's street infrastructure will have the highest priority as 
onomic conditions improve. 

le Town is actively seeking federal funding for the complete reconstruction of Central and South Main 
reets, and the Selectmen will propose a bonding initiative to Town Meeting for reconstruction of Washington 
reet and the North Green street system. All future street improvement projects will be fully coordinated with 
ater line replacement and/or sewer improvements by the Utilities Department. 

2009, the Town prepared and submitted detailed plans to the Federal Railroad Administration for safety 
lprovements at the five grade crossings in Town center. FRA rules require that safety improvements on 
)psfield Road and two other locations be completed by June 2010 in order keep the train horns silent and 
intinue the "quiet zone" in the center of Town. 

ther initiatives in 2009 included a new play structure and complimentary improvements at Bialek Park, 
swich Community Access Media (ICAM) was established as a 501 (c) 3 corporation and was given space for 
studio and office in the lower level of Town Hall. Finally, the Town Manger and other officials in the region 
sre successful in bringing major reform to the Essex Regional Retirement Board. The Town contributes 
iarly $2 million annually for retirement benefits, and the changes in staffing and board membership will 
aintain services to retirees while saving money for municipal employees and the taxpayers. 

>ECIAL ASSISTANT TO THE TOWN MANAGER 

SST. PURCHASING DIRECTOR 

[SK MANAGEMENT/SAFETY COORDINATOR 

ank V. Antonucci 

ie Purchasing Office employee oversees and monitors all department purchases with the exception of the day 
day expenditures of the Electric Department and School Department; puts out to bid expenditures in excess 
$25,000 for goods and services for all departments except the School Department; and bid construction 
ntracts for all departments in excess of $10,000 except the School Department, all in accordance with 
assachusetts General Laws. 

ie Purchasing Office manages all Workers Compensation long-term cases and reports all Town and School 
lployee injuries. All property and casualty insurance claims received were reported to the Town's insurance 
irrier. Insurance renewals, policies and property inventories are maintained by the Purchasing Office . 

52 



In addition to the present contract renewals, the following projects were put out for bid and contracts awarded 
Salt Consortium, Replacement of Town Hall Windows, Snow Plow Contracts, Finance Committee Booklet, 
Disposition of DPW and Utilities Vehicles, Sand Contract, Street Lines Painting, Sidewalk Construction, Roa 
Resurfacing, Hybrid Vehicle Purchase, Bialek Park Field Renovations. 

The Purchasing Office is also responsible for the compiling, editing, printing and the distribution of the Annu 
Town Report. 






DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SAFETY 
POLICE DEPARTMENT 

Paul Nikas, Acting Chief of Police 
Daniel Moriarty. Executive Officer 

The year 2009 continued to be a year of change and transition for the Police Department. Personnel changes 
over the last 5 years have changed the face of the Department from one of familiar, seasoned veterans, to that 
a young, enthusiastic force which is confident in their abilities and training. They strive to continue the high 
level of standards set by their predecessors in servicing and protecting the citizens of Ipswich. Many thanks ai 
due to Retired Chief Gavin Keenan who led the Department during this difficult transition by word and deeds 
He truly led by example. The Department also saw the retirement of two of its most senior patrolmen, Guy 
Saulnier and Donald Cole, who served the Town with distinction for more than 30 years. However with 
transition comes great opportunity. I am pleased to note the Department has hired its first female officer in tei 
years to its ranks. Officer Taryn Brotherton, who is currently attending the Basic Police Recruit Academy, 
joined the Department as a full time officer in October. In addition, the Department has moved forward with 
establishing its Community Resource Unit, which became very active within the community by hosting its 2 n< 
CSI camp for youths, completing two "Fill the Cruiser" food drives and hosting a free movie night. 

The Department Website has been updated regularly to provide more services to the citizens of Ipswich. We 
have added more forms to download, the creation of new anonymous tip lines, live streaming of police radio 
transmissions and a comprehensive list of email contacts for all officers. Please visit our website at 
www.ipswichpolice.org. A new "Prescription Drug Drop Off box is located in the Station lobby for anyone 
who needs a safe and secure location to dispose of expired prescription drugs. We encourage everyone to utili 
this free service. The Department has initiated a free text message notification system, called "Nixel", which < 
will notify citizens of any important news from the Department. Anyone can sign up for this service via the 
website by clicking on the Nixel icon. 

Equipment upgrades to the Department include a new state of the art radio system, which when completed thi 
year, will ensure FCC narrow band compliance two years before it's federally mandated. This radio project w 
ensure that the Department has excellent radio communications for the next 8-10 years. In addition, our in- 
house computer system has been upgraded through a Grant to provide our communication officers with 
Emergency Medical Dispatch capabilities. These upgrades will also provide police officers with Windows 
based programming for report writing and records management. 

As the statistics below indicate, the Police Department had another active year. The Police log reflected a tota 
of 12,375 calls for police service in 2009. Reports of Breaking & Entering showed a significant drop of 50% 
compared to last year and represents a five year low in this category. When you combine this stat with the stat 
calls for suspicious activities, it suggests an increased willingness on the part of the citizenry to be more vigila, 
in protecting their own property and that of their neighbors. We encourage the continuance of these actions, f(, 
the safety of our community cannot be maintained without the active participation of all citizens. 

53 



order to maintain a high level of skill and professional standards in these difficult economic times, the 
epartment initiated an On-Line training program through the Municipal Police Training Committee. This 
itiative, combined with the training of three of our own officers as police training instructors, has allowed the 
epartment to reduce training costs. Officers are no longer required to attend off-site training classes. State 
andated training in first responder, CPR, legal updates, firearms and defensive tactics can all be accomplished 
-house. We continue our long standing relationship with the Ipswich Public Schools through deployment of a 
11-time School Resource Officer and DARE Officer to better serve the youths of Ipswich. As we move 
rward into 2010, the Department will continue to work closely with other Town Departments and agencies in 
i effort to solve problems and better serve the citizenry. 

larms - 665 

nimal Related Calls - 218 

jult Arrests / Summonses - 264 

venile Arrests / Summonses - 5 

>saults- 13 

vaults / Dangerous Weapons - 2 

eaking and Entering - 37 

sturbances - 221 

)mestic Complaints - 78 

aud / ID Theft - 44 

irassing Calls - 37 

ircenies- 102 

alicious Property Damage - 98 

edical Aids - 796 

otor Vehicle Citations - 1268 

otor Vehicle Accidents - 234 

)erating Under Influence Arrests - 39 

otective Custody - 6 

spicious Activity - 388 

issing Persons- 16 

APARTMENT OF FIRE RESCUE SERVICES 

thur Howe III, Fire Chief 

e highlight of 2009 unfortunately, was the loss of Melanson's Boat Shop during a multiple alarm fire on 
igust during the morning of August 7. Fortunately, there were no fatalities or serious injuries in this loss of a 
itoric landmark along the town's riverfront. 

09 was significant for stress on our apparatus fleet as our only ladder truck was substantially damaged in this 
'ly August fast moving fire and had to be taken out of service. It was soon taken to Bulldog Fire Apparatus in 
>pkinton, MA for extensive repairs at the dealer and not returned until January, 2010. Concurrent with this 
mage, Engine 4, the primary pumper at Linebrook, was taken away in August for a planned, extensive 
urbishing, which was completed and returned in February, 2010, substantially under budget. 

ere were two other multiple alarm fires in November, with each occupant barely escaping before the rapid, 
| :ensive spread of fire in their two respective homes. Each of these near tragedies highlight both the need for 
equate numbers of working smoke detectors and for having an escape plan in advance of any emergency. 



54 



October saw a major transition with the retirements of Firefighter William Marchant and Lt. Willard Maker, 

former Chief and Acting Chief. Lt. Maker made numerous contributions here during his 33 years and should 

commended. 

Other highlights include the following: 

1) Firefighter Keith Carlson received American Red Cross Community Hero award in March, 

2) Lieutenant Theriault and Firefighter Prentiss selected as members of the Essex County Technical 
Rescue Team, 

3) Completion of wildfire training for all members in March, 

4) Annual inspections of over 600 hydrants completed in June, 

5) Following extensive research and work, Lieutenant Theriault submitted excellent grant application for 
fire station renovation/expansion to FEMA, ultimately denied to extensive, intense competition and 
limited funding, 

6) Firefighters Matthew Skelley and Spencer Morse hired as members of call force, 

7) Received 20' oil spill response trailer from State DEP replacing 12' trailer. 20" trailer layout and 
equipment distribution much better than 12', 

8) Firefighter Rick Smith promoted to Lieutenant due to retirement of Lt. Maker, 

9) Firefighter James Edwards appointed Training Officer due to resignation of Firefighter Prentiss, who 
to be commended for his work, and 

10) Action Ambulance held numerous continuing education classes throughout year, and several medical 
classes held by Susan Boreri, town resident and Emergency Room Physician from Beverly Hospital. 

We continue to increase our professionalism and standard of service to you, all within the reality of a dauntin 
economic time, one that touches all of us in ways both subtle and profound. Compassionate, professional 
service delivery is our standard. 
Your cooperation is critical in the following ways: 

1) Maintaining smoke and carbon monoxide alarms throughout your home and businesses, 

2) Posting a highly visible house number that can be seen from the street, 

3) Keeping your nearby fire hydrant clear from obstructions, especially snow, and 

4) Practicing a home escape plan. 

Let me take this opportunity to thank all the men and women of Ipswich Fire Rescue for their service to the 
community. 

Statistics: Calls for service: 2079, broken down as follows: 

Structure fires: 1 1 
Other fires: 47 
Medical/rescue: 898 
False alarm: 291 
Mutual aid (given): 17 
Hazardous materials: 50 
Other hazardous responses: 162 
Miscellaneous responses: 603 



55 



4ERGENCY MANAGEMENT 

thur Howe III, Emergency Management Director 

rtunately, there were no critical events in 2009 that required Emergency Management intervention. However, 
Dgress was made in a variety of areas, including the following: 

1) Colleen Fermon, Health Agent, and I created separate food establishment list for Connect CTY phone 
use, 

2) Significant time and effort spent by town staff, especially Health and Emergency Management, related 
to rise of H1N1 virus during April and May. We are all better prepared for future health emergencies 
affecting the community, 

3) S2500 grant application sent to MA Emergency Management Agency (MEMA) June 29. Award 
received July 20, following which Ms. Joana Stathi. town resident and Suffolk Univ. Criminal Justice 
major was hired on part-time, temporary basis to update our Comprehensive Emergency Management 
Plan. Grant expired Sept. 30, after which her services were ended, but we are hopeful award will be 
annual and she can be rehired, 

4) Sergeant Justin Daly appointed as Emergency Management Public Information Officer June 1 following 
resume review and oral interview, 

5) National Incident Management Systems (Federal order) compliance update completed Sept. 23 and sent 
to MEMA. We have made progress, but are not yet in full compliance, and 

6) Letter sent to MEMA Regional Director in November requesting change to Northern Essex Regional 
Emergency Planning Committee, another unfunded federal mandate requiring public oversight for 
hazardous material storage and emergency response. This group meets regularly, is well structured, and 
establishes training exercises for all participating communities. 

i continue to deliberate on the best location for an Emergency Operations Center, with a majority inclined to 
Town Managers Conference Room, and we continue to seek avenues to fund a generator for the building, 
ich has no generator yet. 

ur Emergency Management Team continues to become better trained so that we can provide effective, 
lely, professional service at times of emergency. 

u can help us in a number of ways: 

Please log on to the Town web site home page and look for the Connect CTY orange Sign Up in the upper 

right corner, where you can then edit your own information. Adding your cell phone number, at a minimum, 

could be critical in allowing us to help you in an emergency, 

Have an emergency supply kit or bag ready should you have to leave on short or no notice. Information on 

this can be found by going to Hot Topics in the lower right corner of the following web site, 

www.mass.gov/mema , 

It is also critical to have a family communications plan, again available as in #2 above. Stay safe by being 

prepared. 



56 



ANIMAL CONTROL 

Matt Antczak, Animal Control Officer 

In 2009, Animal Control TNR program had to release only 2 cats back to their habitat due to the cat's behavio 
but found homes for the other 63 cats and kittens. Our Safe Cat program which informs the public to why it is 
healthiest and safest to keep or cats indoors is still being an informative success. With the help of the Ipswich 
Chronicle and the I LOVE IPSWICH web site Animal Control is able to share information easier with the 
public. Even though the goal of creating a dog park had not been filled in 2009, it does look promising for 201, 
fingers are crossed. The Ipswich Humane Group who shares the shelter with Animal Control, has been excelh' 
in finding happy homes for the cats that have come through. The shelter had been under quarantine during the, 
month of December due to an upper respiratory infection in the cats at the shelter but has recovered with a ne\, 
learned procedure There were 2053 dogs licensed in2009. 



I 






HARBORS DEPARTMENT 

Paul A. Nikas, Acting Chief of Police, Harbormaster 
Sgt. Thomas Colpitts, Harbors Supervisor 
Ptl. James Zabelski, Assistant Harbormaster 



The 2009 boating season began in early April with the repair and placement of numerous navigational buoys. 
Additional buoys were added this past season to help ensure the safe navigation to all of the boating public. Ir j 
addition, the commercial crane, located at the Town Wharf, had its foundation repaired, allowing for safe 
operation into the foreseeable future. These improvements were made possible by utilizing funds from the 
Waterways Improvement Fund, with the full support of the Waterways Advisory Committee. In addition to tl 
improvements above, the Harbor Department continued to utilize its new computer software program to 
assist in monitoring and issuing mooring permits. These efforts have seen an increase of nearly 100 
additional mooring permits being issued to the boating public. 

I 
With an increasingly active boating season, the Harbor Patrol Boat and the Jetski Patrol responded to numeroi 

calls for service. These included larcenies from boats, boating accidents, irresponsible operation, boats 

sinking/capsized, boats adrift and medical aids. Assistance and support in many of these calls for service was 

rendered by the Massachusetts Environmental Police, the U.S. Coast Guard, the Ipswich Fire Department 

Rescue Boat and Crane Beach personnel. It's with the continued assistance of all of these Agencies that have 

made the Ipswich waterways a safe and attractive destination to thousands of boaters in the area. 

In its tenth full season, the Ipswich pump out boat, with assistance from the Rowley pump out boat, continued 
to be a valuable asset to the cleanliness of our waterways. This service is free to all boaters and we strongly , 
encourage everyone to continue utilizing its availability for the health of our waterways. In the 2009 boating 
season, the pump out boat removed a total of 2,687 gallons of effluent from area watercraft. 

Department Statistics : 
923 Mooring Permits Issued 
571 In-State Daily Launch Permits 
35 Out of State Daily Launch Permits 
245 In-State Seasonal Launch Permits 
3 Out of State Seasonal Launch Permits 
Launch Fees Collected: $9,670 
Mooring Fees Collected: $57,788 

57 



ELLFISH DEPARTMENT 

)tt LaPreste, Shellfish Constable 

: put down approximately 20 nets with seed boxes in the Eagle Hill River area in the late spring to catch wild 
d. We also put down 38 nets in various spots in the Plum Island Sound area, to cover the 520,000 clam seed 
chased through Salem State in October. This was funded through a surcharge on commercial licenses for 
lancement of this kind. This seed will be harvestable in 2 to 3 years. The Shellfish Department working in 
ijunction with the State Division of Marine Fisheries worked to establish new rain fall closure criteria for the 
a known as N-7. This will increase the days that this area is open to harvest for all license holders in the 
ivn of Ipswich. 

; Shellfish Sub Committee has started a plan to repair Eagle Hill landing. The plan is to remove some rocks 
I fill in some soft spots to increase the parking space on the landing. 

September, former Constable Arnold "Pick" Thistle wood retired and I was hired to replace him. There was 
Red Tide outbreak in 2009. Rainfall closures were an issue, particularly in the early summer and fall, 
infall closures accounted for 140 lost digging days. 



creational: 




Commercial: 


Estimated Harvests: 




sident Family 


183 


Commercial Licenses 125 


Soft Shell Clams 


14,470 Bushels 


sident Individual 


102 


Over 70 (free) 8 


Razor Clams 


110 Bushels 


n Resident 


270 


Total Commercial 138 


Oysters 


6,890 Individuals 


tal Recreational 


555 


Total Licenses issued: 693 







BLIC WORKS DIRECTORATE 

hard W. Clarke, Director 

i Public Works Department is a customer focused service organization, dedicated to maintaining and 
)roving the town's infrastructure through the efforts of a professional town work force, outsourced 
itracting and engineering consultants. With that as our mission, Public Works incorporates an on-going 
iew of what we do and how we do it, with the intent of delivering high quality service to our customers and 
lancing the quality of life in our diverse community. Customer focus, continuous process improvement, 
nan resource development, and resource management are the keys to our success. 

)lic Works accomplished or is working on the following items in support of our mission: 

• Alignment of Public Works budgets, activity and resources with the expectations and goals of the Town 
Manager and Board of Selectmen. 

• Provide technical input to Town boards and commissions on special permits, subdivisions, site plan 
reviews and commercial and residential development that impact Public Works' Operations and 
Maintenance (O & M) responsibilities and budget. 

• Implemented a Storm water Management Plan to comply with the Phase II Storm water Rules and 
Regulations of the Federal Clean Water Act. 

• Established a work order system for all Public Works Divisions. 

• Developed and implemented Operations and Maintenance plans for existing water quality structures 
installed for storm water management. 

58 



• Establish a Federal Railroad Administration Quiet Zone to maintain a quiet zone designation for all 
public railroad crossings in Ipswich. Quiet zones are railroad crossings where trains will not blow 
warning horns upon approach. 

• Use a pavement management plan to identify and schedule those roads most in need of roadway 
improvements and maintenance. 

HIGHWAY DIVISION 

During the warmer months, the focus is on outdoor construction projects, where personnel skills and heavy 
equipment produce significant infrastructure repair and improvements to roads, sidewalks, public facilities ai 
storm water structures. A work order system was implemented in 2009 to prioritize, schedule and track tasks 



FORESTRY DIVISION 

The focus of the Forestry Division in 2009 was on the maintenance of town trees along public ways and in tc 
cemeteries, parks and open space. The Forestry budget is reimbursed by the Utilities Department for line 
clearing done for the Electric Light Division. 



EQUIPMENT MAINTENANCE DIVISION 

Closer inspection and additional preventive maintenance of vehicles extends the service life and reduces the 
maintenance costs of a public works fleet. The equipment maintenance facility at the Public Works Garage ( 
County Road does not provide the level of maintenance required to adequately achieve this goal. Efforts are 
underway to fund a design for a replacement Public Works facility, including a vehicle maintenance and rep; 
shop and indoor wash facility. 

TRANSFER STATION 

The Transfer Station accepts yard waste, specifically grass clippings, leaves, brush and small branches and is 
open Wednesdays and Saturdays - 8:00 AM until 3:30 PM. White goods, electrical appliances, televisions a 
computer monitors are disposed of curbside by the Town's trash contractor through the purchase of a $25 
sticker, available at the Public Works office in Town Hall. The Transfer Station is operated by members oft 
Highway Division. 

Public Works' Special Collections are conducted twice yearly at the Transfer Station. We accept oil based 
paints and related products, car batteries, fluorescent bulbs, tires and mercury (which is also accepted at the 
Public Works Office at the Town Hall during regular business hours of operation). The fall collection is helc 
conjunction with the Health Department's Household Hazardous Waste Collection Day to better serve reside 

SANITATION 

Each pound of recyclable material that is diverted from the trash stream results in a reduction of our trash cos ; 
since the Town is charged a fixed fee for pickup of recyclables and a tipping fee for every pound of trash 
collected. The total tonnage of solid waste picked up in calendar year 2009 (3849 tons) decreased by 201 ton 
over that collected in 2008 (4050 tons), a decrease of 4% and a savings to the town of $19,497. 



59 



OW & ICE OPERATIONS 

e winter of 2008-2009 was a challenge for both Town employees and contractors who work to keep the 

ds, public sidewalks, schools and town parking lots safe and passable. 

s cost for snow and ice operations exceeded the budgeted amount by $228,756. 

cess for emergency response vehicles is the first priority for Town crews during snow and ice operation. 

dw removal from sidewalks in close proximity to schools is also a high priority after roadways are cleared for 

dents walking to school. 




CILITIES MANAGEMENT DEPARTMENT 

lliam A. Hodge, Sr. Facilities Director 

e H. Spellman, Assistant to the Facilities Director 

s report contains the accomplished tasks of the Facilities Management Department during the calendar year 
)9. Daily operations during this period included the response to and completion of 914 work orders with an 
rage productivity rate of 92% from the Facilities staff, in addition to 17 major projects. 

i projected Facilities' mission for 2009 was to improve the overall appearance, safety, working and living 
iditions of the buildings within the Municipal Complex. Additionally, to upgrade the preventive 
intenance to the buildings and equipment of the Town's facilities for safety and economic improvements by 
itinuing service contracts from outside vendors and improving the job knowledge of the in-house staff. To 
i end, six service contracts are in place for Fire Safety, HVAC, Plumbing, Masonry, Elevator, Generator, and 
ctrical Services. 

i major projects were completed with the additional funds allocated for this purpose and were accomplished 
outside contractors, in-house staff, and over 2,437 hours of labor requested of and provided by the County 
Tectional Facility. The following are the major projects completed during this year: 

i Stations - Re-roofing of the Linebrook Fire Station was accomplished in the fall. Installed a drainage 

tern in the basement of the Central Fire Station to prevent mold build up and remove rancid odors. Facilities 

laced the old damaged 60% efficient boiler with a new 95% efficient boiler. 



60 



Cemetery Department - Repaired and painted the Old School House Building at the entrance to Highland 
Cemetery. Removed worn and stained carpet from the Cemetery Office and replaced it with vinyl tile. Paint 
the interior of the Cemetery Office. Repaired and painted the exterior wood of the office building. 




Town Hall - Completed Phases II & III of the window replacement project by removing the old single panes 
windows and replacing with more efficient aluminum thermal pane windows on the lower front and the upp< 
rear of the building. Renovated two areas on the ground floor level of the Town Hall to accommodate the 
Ipswich Community Access Media (ICAM) studio and office. Installed a safety fence between Town Hall a 
the banking of the Ipswich River. Replaced scored and damaged concrete landing at main entrance to Town 
Hall with a new granite slab surface. 




Library - Scraped, painted and repaired the fences and benches on the exterior of the Library. Removed and 
replaced the old inefficient oil fired boiler with a new 95% efficient gas fired boiler. 

The Police Station HVAC upgrades as funding allowed. DPW Garage - Removed and replaced the leaking 
rubber roof over the garage. Repaired and replaced window frames and windows. Did minor electrical and 
plumbing upgrades as funding allowed. 

In the coming year, the Facilities Department plans to continue to address the multiple problems within the 
Town Physical Plant with a focus on energy, safety, and esthetics of the Cemetery Building, Animal Shelter ; 
the Public Library, plus address more improvements on the other buildings as funding allows. 



61 




:metery & PARKS 

FFREY M. PUTUR, SUPERINTENDENT 

e Cemetery and Parks Department primary focus is the completion of all interments year-round in all of the 
neteries in Ipswich. The Department is responsible for the care and maintenance of nine cemeteries and 
/en parks, plus all town commons, the Ipswich resident side of Crane Beach and Boardwalk, and Pavilion 
ach. In addition, we maintain all town-owned Open Space areas, such as Strawberry Hill, Dow Brook 
nservation, Shady Creek, and Nichols Field. During the winter season as weather permits, Bakers Pond is 
•wed off to accommodate skaters. 

; also assist civic groups in the many activities that take place throughout the year as well as supply 
istance to the Public Works Department in snow removal, sanding operations, and other emergency 
lations as needed. We provide aid to the Town Clerk in setting up voting equipment and tables for all 
ctions, as well as supplies necessary for the Town Meetings held twice a year. In 2009, the staff completed 
interments; excavated, formed, and poured two dugouts, and assisted with the removal and then the 
istruction of the new backstop at the Bialek Park 90' baseball field. We worked in the preparation and 
istruction of new playground equipment at the Great Neck and Bialek Parks; drilled 264 post holes for the 
v equipment and spread 500 yards of play-ground mulch. 

VENUE 



apel Tent: 
jndations: 
enings: 
petual Care: 
e of Lots: 



$1050 

$4332 

$34800 

$8500 

$10200 



TOTAL: 



$58882 






62 



DEPARTMENT OF CODE ENFORCEMENT 
BUILDING DEPARTMENT 

James A. Sperber, Director 



JANUARY 1, 2009 TO DECEMBER 31, 2009 



Category / Construction 


#of 
Permits 


Total Fees 


Value of Work 


Additions 


19 


$17,080.50 


$1,855,182.00 


Attached Accessory 





$0.00 


$0.00 


Certificate of Occupancy 


73 


$1,525.00 


$0.00 


Commercial - New 


6 


$5,025.00 


$545,000.00 


Commercial - Alter. 


19 


$8,112.40 


$879,093.00 


Decks & Porches 


32 


$3,454.50 


$312,900.00 


Demo & Reconstruct 


4 


$5,457.50 


$592,600.00 


Demolition 


8 


$549.00 


$63,000.00 


Detached Accessory 


36 


$3,552.00 


$271,608.00 


Fence 


7 


$450.00 


$29,880.00 


Multi-Family Dwelling 








$0.00 


Miscellaneous 


48 


$4,102.50 


$442,573.00 


Remodel/Alteration 


115 


$22,538.50 


$2,334,525.00 


Repair 


85 


$8,805.60 


$661,609.26 


Roofs, Siding, Windows 


223 


$24,318.15 


$2,090,648.59 


Single Family Attached 


10 


$30,125.00 


$3,320,600.00 


Single Family Dwelling 


7 


$8,599.00 


$942,280.00 


Sign 


31 


$1,635.00 


$43,866.00 


Solid Fuel Burning Appliances 


15 


$1,095.00 


$41,263.90 


Swimming Pools 


7 


$1,163.00 


$100,965.00 


Tents 


73 


$90.00 


$207,290.00 


Totals 


818 


$147,677.65 


$14,734,883.75 



Plumbing 



Total Fees 



186 $13,540.00 



Electric Permits 



Gas 



Total Fees 



170 



$8,190.00 



Total Fees 



335 



$32,581.00 



The above is based on permit activity for the calendar year. The fiscal year, however, runs from July 1 st 
through June 30 th . Below are total building permit fees for those periods in "FY 09" & "FY 10". 



July 1 , 2007 through to June 30, 2007 
July 1, 2008 through to June 30, 2008 



$164,737.88 
$168,699.79 



63 



ase remember that building permits are required for not only new construction, but for repairs and 
lacement of existing structures, decks, sheds, signs, & fences also. If you have any question about whether 
lr project may require a building permit, please call our office at 978-356-6605. 



•Jf •^•^•^•Jf-Jf^: -Jfif^^if^^ 



IEALTH DEPARTMENT 

Colleen E. Fermon, Health Agent 



Following is the yearly report of activities for 2009: 



Licenses and Permits Issued 




Health Inspections and Investigations 






Food Service 


60 


Food Service Inspections 




172 


Retail Food 


32 


Nuisance, Health and Environmental 






Caterer 


8 


Complaints 




11 


Temporary Food 


50 


Housing Inspections 




27 


Mobile Food 


7 


Lead Determinations 




1 


Frozen Desserts 


2 


Title 5 Inspection Reports 




63 


Biological Haulers 


1 


Deep Hole Observations 




50 


Septic Haulers 


27 


Percolation Tests 




25 


Septic Installers 


51 


Septic System Inspections 




112 


Septic System Inspectors 


27 


Swimming Pool Inspections 




19 


Swimming Pools 


8 


Bathing Water Testing 




77 


Recreational Camps 


2 


Recreational Camps for Children 




2 


Motels 


2 


Motels. Inns and B&B's 




2 


Bottling 


1 








Tobacco 


16 








Funeral Directors 


2 


Plan Review 






Disposal System Permits 


51 


Septic Plan Review 




70 


Well Permits 


3 


Septic As-built Review 
Food Plan Review 




22 
9 


Sealer of Weights & Measures 




HACCP Plan Review 




2 


Liquid Measuring Meters 


65 


Well Plan Review- 




3 


Scales & Balances 


82 


Building Plan Review 




111 


Scanners 


12 










Community Health 






Disease Surveillance 




Immunizations 






Campylobacteriosis 


5 


Seasonal Influenza 


391 




Legionellosis 


1 


H1N1 Influenza 


645 




Salmonellosis 


3 








LTBI 


3 


Health Fairs 


2 




Hepatitis B 


1 


Wellness Clinics 


34 




Hepatitis C 


8 








Lyme Disease 


30 








Ehrlichiosis 


3 








Babesiosis 


2 









64 






Group B Streptococcus 3 

Invasive Haemophilus 1 

Influenzae 

Human Granulocytic 4 

Anaplasmosis 



Board of Health Members: Susan Hubbard, Chairperson, Spencer Amesbury and Charles Hill. 



ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS 

Robert A. Grambale, Chairman 

The Zoning Board of Appeals serves two functions. First, they are empowered to issue special permits and 
variances. Second, they are the local authority where someone who feels aggrieved may appeal an enforcem; 
order issued by the Zoning Enforcement Officer specifically when the order alleges a violation of the Ipswic j 
Zoning Regulations. The Board can also overturn a ruling or decision of the Zoning Enforcement Officer. 
Orders issued under the Massachusetts Building Code (780 CMR) may be appealed to a different board (Sta 
Building Code Appeals Board). 

Several uses mentioned in the Table of Uses, Ipswich Zoning Bylaw [IBL], section V-D would only be alio* 
if the Board chooses to grant a special permit. Special permits may also authorize an expansion of a previoi 
existing, non-conforming use or structure as outlined in [IBL], II-B & XI-J. Existing non-conforming structi 
and uses are most commonly referred to as Grandfathered. The Zoning Board may also issue a variance. Tl 
would allow a use that is ordinarily prohibited or a structure to be constructed, expanded or altered where th 
bylaw would otherwise prohibit such expansion or alteration. Variances should only be granted where a 
hardship exists and only when the hardship is directly related to the land. Some examples are soil 
characteristics, shape or topography. If someone feels there is a financial hardship, it must also be related to 
land in some manner. Special permits could be granted if the proposed work or use does not have a detrimer 
effect on the surrounding neighborhood. Some of the general categories of consideration are any increase of 
traffic, parking, noise, dust odors etc. 

The Ipswich Zoning Board of Appeals meets the third Thursday of each month except during December. All 
applications must be filed in the Town Clerks office by 4:00 PM; dates are subject to change. Meetings are 
posted in Town Hall at least 48 hours prior to meeting. 

PLANNING & DEVELOPMENT DEPARTMENT 

Glenn C. Gibbs, Director 

The Department of Planning & Development is responsible for guiding the development and conservation of 
land in the Town of Ipswich, both through the regulatory process and through the development and 
implementation of long-range plans. It does this in part by providing support and guidance for each of the , 
boards and commissions within its directorate: the Planning Board, the Conservation Commission, the 
Historical Commission, and the Affordable Housing Partnership (reports on their activities are given below). 
The Department also provides support to the Open Space Committee, the Affordable Housing Trust Fund 
Board, the Design Review Board, the Agricultural Commission, and various ad hoc committees. Listed belo\ 
are some of the initiatives undertaken by the Department in 2009: 

65 



Drafted three zoning articles for fall town meeting, all of which wert adopted (for more on these articles, 
see Planning Board report below). 

Submitted a Commonwealth Capital Application to the State and scored in the top ten percent of 
Massachusetts communities, enhancing the Town's chances of receiving certain state grants. 

Executed agreement with the State to fund the design of the North Green Streetscape Improvement Project, 
hired design consultant and began design process, and secured funding commitment from the State to 
construct the improvements in FY 1 1/12. 

Under the direction of the Open Space Program Manager, undertook numerous open space initiatives, 
including: (1) represented the Town in a partnership project to conserve Maplecroft Farm, a 247-acre 
property which was one of the highest priorities on the Open Space Bond list due to its multiple resource 
values, agricultural values, wetlands, and scenic views. Partners included the Trust for Public Land, the 
State Departments of Agricultural Resources and Conservation and Recreation, and Essex County 
Greenbelt. The Town's commitment of $2.1 million in Open Space Bond funds will leverage an additional 
$3 million to acquire conservation and agricultural preservation rights for $5.1 million; (2) worked with a 
subcommittee of the Open Space Committee and Agriculture Commission to hire consultants Walter 
Cudnohufsky Associates to complete an Analysis of Ipswich Agriculture and Agricultural Land. The Study 
was presented to the Board of Selectmen, other Boards and Committees, and to the public; and (3) worked 
with the Open Space Committee to explore options for continuing the Town's Open Space Program after the 
original $10 million bond authorization is spent. These options include passage of another Open Space Bond 
or passage of the Community Preservation Act in Ipswich. 

Under the direction of the Open Space Stewardship Coordinator, undertook a variety of stewardship efforts, 
including the following: coordinated with school groups at Doyon Elementary and Ipswich High working 
on vernal pool educational signage and native species re-planting project for Town-owned conservation 
properties; moved permitting through approval process for construction of Great Neck Conservation Area 
Clark Pond overlook to be built in 2010; conducted property inspections on Town-held conservation 
restrictions assisted by a part-time, seasonal Conservation Restriction Monitor; installed informational kiosk 
and property entrance and parking signs at Linebrook Woods Conservation, in conjunction with Cemetery 
and Parks crews; coordinated with Ipswich Police Department in continuing efforts to cut down on illegal 
ATV/ORV use on Town watershed lands on and around Dow Brook Conservation Area through police 
patrols, landowner outreach mailing, and additional sign posting; and completed a Natural Resources Report 
in coordination with the Open Space Committee for the Turkey Hill Conservation Area on Pineswamp 
Road. 

is past summer the Department was very fortunate to have the services of Tufts graduate student Eric 
tiecal, who in his role as summer intern provided valuable assistance on various planning initiatives, 
hiding the zoning amendments, the scenic road bylaw, and the North Green Improvement Project. 






ANNING BOARD 

n Purinton, Co-Chair 
i Manzi, Co-Chair 

cause of the continued economic downturn, much of the Planning Board's regulatory activity in 2009 related 
existing projects rather than new ones. Still, at least two of those were significant review efforts: ( 1 ) a major 
lesign of the residential development proposed for Turner Hill (still under review at year's end); and (2) the 

66 



•1 

reconsideration of a six lot subdivision off Heartbreak Road. As such, the Board remained busy despite the 
scarcity of new applications. Also, the variety of applications provided the Board opportunities to promote 
appropriate and context-sensitive development in Ipswich. While the Board's membership was maintained 
throughout the year, Jim Manzi announced that he would be reluctantly stepping down in January of 2010 
because he was moving out of town. His valuable contributions over the years as both a co-chair and a Boar 
member will be deeply missed. Brian Hone will be assuming the co-chair position vacated by Jim. 

Planning Matters 

The Board took an active role in the following major initiatives in 2009: 

• Zoning Changes . The Board sponsored two articles for the Fall Town Meeting, both of which w< 
adopted. One established sustainable development measures, including a requirement that munic 
building projects meet LEED® certification standards (i.e., green buildings) and another that 
reduced impermeable surface areas requirements where appropriate. The adoption of the article 
continued the Planning Board's efforts, consistent with the 2003 Community Development Plan,, 
conserve resources and energy when undertaking new development. The second article addresse 
miscellaneous ambiguities, omissions or inadequacies of the bylaw, an annual housekeeping iten 
the zoning amendment process. 

• Scenic Roads Amendment and Designations . After holding a public hearing in the fall of 2009 o 
amendments to the Town's Scenic Road Bylaw to address inadequacies and omissions of the by] 
as well as designate five additional roads as scenic, the Town voted to adopt the amendment at tl 
Fall Town Meeting. The newly designated scenic roads are: 

• Linebrook Road from Howe Street to Leslie Road 

• Mile Lane 

• Old Right Road from Route 1 to Linebrook Road 

• Paradise Road 

• Plains Road 

Regulatory Matters 

The Planning Board took the following regulatory actions in 2009: 



• 



• 



Modified the special permit for a monopole at 2 Turnpike Road to allow for the installation of additii 
wireless antennae. 

Issued a special permit for an additional residential unit in an existing accessory building at 15 Currit 
Park. 

Modified a definitive subdivision approval at 1 13 Pineswamp Road by waiving a requirement relativ 
off-site road improvements. 

• Approved a 6-lot subdivision on Heartbreak Road following a court-ordered remand to hear the 
application anew. 

• Modified the special permit and site plan review for the Brewery located at 2 Brewery Place to allow 
granite curbing and motion detector activated lighting. 



67 



• Modified a special permit relative to the construction commencement date at 49 Turnpike Road. 

• Modified a site plan review relative to lighting at 25 and 29 Old Right Road. 

e Board also reviewed and endorsed seven applications for ANR (Approval Not Required under Subdivision 
>ntrol Law) plans. 



rjcrfcrf:;*::*::*::*::*::*:^:*::*::*::*: 



)NSERVATION COMMISSION 

ivid Standley, Chair 

inifer Hughes, Vice Chair 

vid Pancoast, Conservation Agent 

inces I. Doyle. Recording Secretary 

e Conservation Commission is comprised of seven appointed residents who serve as unpaid volunteers. They 
:: David Standley (Chair). Jennifer Hughes (Vice-Chair). Sissy FFolliott. Brian O'Neill. Sharon dishing and 
rl Kastorf. Barbara Beaman's term ended in May of 2009. and she did not seek reappointment, as she was 
ocating to Vermont. The Commission thanks Barbara for her significant contributions over six years of 
-vice to the Town. The beginning of 2009 also saw the arrival of resident Gail Surpitski as Recording 
:retary and Administrative Assistant. 

e Commission is engaged in a variety of activities in behalf of the Town, including land conservation and 
:ser\ ation. Most of its time, however, is occupied with its formal role as the local environmental regulator}' 
ard under the Massachusetts Wetlands Protection Act and the Ipswich Wetlands Protection Bylaw, both of 
ich focus on water resource regulations. 

2009. the Commission continued regulatory oversight of several ongoing projects, including the Turner Hill 
2at Estates Preservation Development and Riverpoint (f/k/a Ipswich Pines) 40B Housing Development on 
psfield Road. The Commission also routinely addressed myriad official filings, requests, emergencies. 
•lations and citizen's queries, as shown in the table below, and numerous unofficial requests, submissions. 
uiries, and related matters that are not tabulated. The list compares the 2009 permitting activities with the 
vious five calendar years, to indicate trends and changes in the various tabulated categories, and shows the 
ming average number of permitting activities over the past six years. 



Activity 


2004 


2005 


2006 


2007 


2008 


2009 


Avg 


Orders of Conditions/ 
Amendments 


61 


56 


31 


32 


37 


35 


41 


Orders Resource Area 
Delineation 


3 


4 


1 


1 


1 





2 


Determinations of 
Applicability 


41 


31 


22 


29 


34 


29 


31 


Certificates of 
Compliance 


18 


21 


28 


27 


11 


16 


20 


Extension Permits 


6 


6 


10 


5 


8 


9 


7 


Enforcement Actions 


17 


13 


11 


15 


19 


8 


14 


Other* 


67 


49 


37 


26 


30 


14 


37 


Totals 


213 


180 


140 


135 


140 


111 


153 



68 



* "Other" includes various official filings not tabulated in categories, such as Emergency Certifications & 
Minor Modifications, as well as scheduled Citizens' Queries . 

To accomplish the permitting process, Commission members attended 23 regularly scheduled evening 
meetings, visited numerous projects and fielded dozens of Citizens' Queries. Staff continues to respond to 
hundreds of routine queries, and to inspect all proposed project sites before hearings and during project 
activities. 

The Commission's 2009 efforts in land acquisition and management of open space continued in concert witli 
Open Space Committee, the Board of Selectmen, the Open Space Bond Program Manager, and the Open Sp!; 
Stewardship Coordinator. A primary focus was on the acquisition of significant Agricultural Preservation ail 
Conservation Restrictions over most of Maplecroft Farms, located between Argilla, Heartbreak, Essex, and i 
Northgate Roads. The acquisition, which is scheduled to happen in the spring of 2010, involves partnership 
with state agencies as well as private partners. 

I 

Through its Chairman, the Commission is playing a strong role in the creation of regulations to support 
administration of a local Stormwater Management Bylaw put into effect in the fall of 2009. The local Wetla 
Bylaw is slated to be brought into full conformity with the Stormwater Bylaw during 2010. The end of 200 ( : 
saw the Town purchasing a comprehensive permitting software package, which will benefit the Commissioi 
and other departments in terms of tracking and processing and issuance of permits. It is expected to be in p I 
in calendar 2010. 

HISTORICAL COMMISSION 

June S. Gahan, Chair 

The Ipswich Historical Commission meets monthly to assist property owners and various Town properties i 
identifying, evaluating, preserving and protecting historic assets in Ipswich over 75 years old. Historic horn 
for which the Commission provided assistance in 2009 included: 108 Central Street, 52 North Main Street, 
Summer Street, and 9 Ward Street. 

The Commission reviewed, conducted site visits, and took action on several projects in 2009: 

• Trustees of Reservations - Appleton Home 

• Turner Hill - Mary's House 

• Nathaniel Treadwell House 

• Isaac Goodale House 

• High Street Bridge replacement 

The Commission allowed a 19 th century school house to be moved to 178 Argilla Road. 

Christine Beard was hired to update approximately seven Form Bs on historic Ipswich homes. We also hire* 
Johanne Cassia to take photographs inside and outside of approximately covenanted homes. 

The Mary Conley Award was given to Bryan Townsend for the restoration of his c. 1838 barn. 

The Commission made a recommendation to the Town Manager that he name Pat Turner as the Town 
Historian. 



In October we lost a dear member and friend, Nancy Thompson. She served as secretary for the Commissioi 
always helping and going beyond the call of duty. She is missed! 

69 






OUSING PARTNERSHIP 

ichael Schaaf, Chair 

FFORDABLE HOUSING TRUST FUND BOARD 

isan Monahan, Chair 

le mission of the Ipswich Housing Partnership is to promote and assist with the expansion and preservation of 
fordable housing in Ipswich in a manner consistent with the community's objectives and character. The 
trtnership works closely with the Affordable Housing Trust Fund Board, which was established in 2005 to 
'ersee and expend funds paid to the Town for affordable housing purposes by developers as a result of zoning 
quirements. By its Articles of Incorporation, two of the Trust Fund Board members must be members of the 
irtnership, and the two groups often meet jointly, 
itiatives undertaken and/or completed by the Partnership and Trust Fund Board in 2009 included: 

' • Authorized a $40,000 grant from the Affordable Housing Trust Fund to create a permanently affordable 
one bedroom unit newly constructed at 21-23 South Main Street. This condominium was marketed 
under an Affirmative Fair Market Plan in December for a price of SI 35,655. A low/moderate income 
buyer is expected to purchase it by late spring of 2010. 

■ • Supported a request from the YMCA of the North Shore to receive $85,000 in federal HOME funds 
from the Town to facilitate the completion of the Powder House Village project, which will create 48 
units of affordable rental housing for households with incomes ranging between 30% and 80% of the 
Area Median Income. The funds will be used to undertake modifications to the building and site that 
were requested by the Selectmen and agreed to by the YMCA. 

The reconstruction of a carriage house at 98 Central Street into a two-bedroom permanently affordable 
condominium was completed in June. A competitive application process resulted in the selection of a 
two person, first-time homebuyer household. The unit was sold for $151,000, and owners moved into in 
the fall. 

Granting of three $10,000 awards in down payment assistance to income-eligible, first-time 
homebuyers. Two were provided through the balance of the Town's expiring 2008 HOME allotment, 
while the third was provided through the Ipswich Affordable Housing Trust Fund. 

• The preservation of affordability in the resale of a three-bedroom house at 7 Ruth's Way, built by Cape 
Ann Habitat for Humanity several years ago. At Habitat's request, the Partnership coordinated the 
marketing and buyer selection process, and in March sold the house for $73,788 to a family of five 
whose income did not exceed 50% of the Area Median Income. 

e Trust Fund took in approximately $88,000 in 2009, most of which came from four separate housing 
»jects; $3,670 came from investment income; and another $3,670 came as reimbursements for administrative 
its from the North Shore Home Consortium. Expenses for the year were $10,000 for first time home buyer 
istance; $8,000 disbursed to housing development initiatives; and $18,020 for staff and administration;. The 
ir-end balance of the Trust was $326,024, with an additional obligation of $154,000 expected to be paid over 
next couple of years. 



• 



• 



i membership of the Partnership and Trust Fund saw some changes in 2009. Selectman Ingrid Miles joined 
joined the Affordable Housing Trust Fund Board in June of 2009, replacing outgoing Selectman Jim Foley, 
o served on the Trust Board since 2007. Toward the end of the year, Donald Bowen stepped down after 



70 



many years of devoted effort to the Partnership. Staff assistance in 2009 was provided primarily by Tom 
Bentley and Glenn Gibbs. 






OPEN SPACE COMMITTEE 

Carolyn Britt and Wayne Castonguay, Co-Chairs 

Accomplishments in 2009 for the Open Space Committee were (working with the Ag Commission) the 
completion of the Ag Study prepared and presented to the town by Walter Cudhofsky Associates WCA. Ei| 
will now be focused on its implementation. After some updating and revisions the 2006 - 201 1 Open SpacJ 
received a two year extension. 

The OSC continues its search to locate, evaluate and acquire land suitable for athletic fields with on-going 
assistance from the Athletic Field Study Committee. Our hardworking Open Space Bond Manager. Krister 
Grubbs, has fielded several offers by private landsowners for this as well. The central project for 2009, 
supported wholeheartedly by voters at the fall Town Meeting, was (and continues to be) the protection oft 
agricultural and conservation interests at Maplecroft Farm. Part of this project includes a plan for the conti 
use of the soccer fields and a trail easement. 

Discussion and dialogue continue between the Board of Selectmen and others town boards as to what dire< j 
to take after the current Open Space Bond is spent - create a new Bond or go with the increasingly popula 
Community Preservation Act. 






AGRICULTURAL COMMISSION 

Royce Knowlton and Warren Jepson, Co-Chairs 

2009 was a busy year for the Agriculture Commission. Highlights include: 

Right-to-Farm Bylaw - The Commission worked closely with the Planning Department to craft the Ipswi i 
Right to Farm Bylaw which was passed unanimously at the fall town meeting. 

Analysis of Ipswich Agriculture and Agricultural Lands - Former Chair Laura Russell, along with 
participation from members of the Commission and farmers in the community, worked with the Open Spa j 
Committee, the Planning Board, and Walter Cudnohufsky Associates, to complete a study of all the 
agriculturally viable land in Ipswich. The study which was completed in December can now be used as a ti j 
pinpoint and prioritize ways to keep the agricultural community in Ipswich strong. 

As a result of the study, the Commission will start to look into other markets for local produce. One idea is i 
open up conversations with the school department about using local produce in their lunch program, while 
trying to involve the students in the program in some way. Efforts will also look at ways to connect additic I 
land that may have potential for farming, with interested farmers. The study is very comprehensive and 
interesting reading. For anyone interested it can now be viewed on the Town of Ipswich web site. 

Ipswich 375 th Celebration - The Agricultural Commission participated in the 375 Ih festivities manning all 
at the Town Picnic distributing information and bookmarks that represent the various agricultural entities i I 
town. 



71 






SJSSJC****:):*****:!::): 



UMAN SERVICES DEPARTMENT 

izabeth M. Dorman, Director 

ECREATION DEPARTMENT 

izabeth M. Dorman, Recreation Director 

le Recreation Department continued its mission to maintain a variety of programs, services, and activities to 
hance the social, physical, and emotional well being of all our citizens. 

)mmunity events included the July 4th parade & field day, a Halloween parade & program, and parades on 
emorial Day and Veterans' Day organized by local veterans' groups. Programs featured an outdoor concert by 
i West Newbury Volunteer Fire Association Band as well as one by the Ipswich Community Band, a UNH 
iravan Show, a magic show for Harry Potter's Birthday celebration, a staff and student talent show, and the 
nual "Foam Frolic" at Bialek Park. 

mmer offerings included tennis lessons at the high school courts, golf lessons at Ipswich Country Club, 
orkreation job training and social events for young teens, Jr. Summer Fun weeks, Theatre Camp week, and 
jl camp week coordinated by the Police Dept . Open swim was contracted at the YMCA, and resident lot 
rking attendants were funded at Crane's Beach. 

inter programs included two ski programs for grades 3-5 and 6-8, and February vacation week featured Star 
ars, Twilight Zones, Treasure Island and our annual Harry Potter Day. After school programs included 
mework and computer projects, crafts, adventure and sports activities, cooking, crafts, and weekly off-site 
3S. April vacation activities included It's a Small World, Wally's World, a tour of Fenway Park, and an 
loor carnival. Children's golf classes were offered at the Rowley Country Club during spring and fall seasons, 
day Fun Nights continued for school aged children with crafts, gym games, and special events. Adult 
ivities at Town Hall included basketball, soccer, ping pong, and user-funded sessions in bridge, Spanish, 
ving, and knitting. Outdoor lights were used at Bialek Park for informal soccer and ultimate Frisbee, an adult 
"tball league, spring and summer girls' Softball, and youth football practices. 

wn Hall facilities including a program room, kitchen, cafeteria, lounge, crafts room, Teen Center, and 
mnasium were scheduled by the Recreation Department for local sports, scouts, and social service agencies' 
:etings and programs for residents of all ages. Gym space was shared by youth basketball teams including the 
4CA in the winter, indoor soccer, and wrestling in the summer, cheerleading in the fall and ongoing ping 
ng, basketball, and soccer for adults. 

•nations from many local individuals, and organizations, as well as an appropriation from the Town Meeting, 
wided funding for a new playground at Bialek Park in late fall. Installation by community volunteers and 
)d items from local businesses demonstrated the community involvement that makes this project possible for 
wonderful, well-used, new resource at the site. 

e seven-member Recreation Commission and Recreation Director met regularly throughout the year to 
cuss programs, facilities, and policies as well as to plan for the future. Members continued to volunteer at a 
tnber of our regular programs. 

:[s:i«:(;>|s;l<#* ******* 



72 



YOUTH SERVICES 

Marcia Ford, Youth Director 

Youth services in Ipswich are dedicated to improving the lives of Ipswich youth by offering a number of a i 
programs to meet recreational, academic, and social needs of this unique population. Our foundation contini: 
be community collaboration, and many programs were developed as joint ventures with other local agenc j 
direct response to community needs. 

Community service projects were organized for volunteer teens, church and Scouts groups, and those rel] 
through the local courts and Juvenile Diversion programs. They were involved in cleaning and painting proje* 
Town Hall and Bialek Park. Others provided help with our youth programs and some services for needy i 
citizens. 

After school enrichment continued and homework sessions led by staff and supportive volunteers were 
incorporated into the daily programs. Inter-generational experiences with senior citizens helped to teach knji 
and quilting to interested youngsters. Thursday early release days provided opportunities for field trips to { 
various educational and recreational sites. 

Talk To A Friend, our peer leadership program for grades 6-8, met weekly to receive training on current i 
issues and discuss relationships with peers and family members. Students helped chaperone activities for yo | 
children while learning some mentoring and mediation skills. Members help with set up and cleaning duti 
weekly drop-in nights and receive training in sales procedures to operate an on-site snack bar that offers reaso 
priced items for attendees. A web site for teens promoted current offerings and surveyed suggestions for { 
programs and activities. Ipswich Peer Leaders, a high school group formed by TTAF "graduates" have i 
engaged in similar leadership and service opportunities as well as job training skills. 

Summer "Workreation" for students entering grade 7-9 and a new "Bridge" group for grade 6 provided job trj | 
and work experiences in our offerings as well as help at the Birth to Three Center. Also were daily reading se: 
with young day campers and weekly visits to the Library to get books and attend their special events. Stal i 
youth volunteers led efforts in constructing a float during the summer for the 375 th anniversary parade, 
students, staff members, and parent volunteers marched proudly in front of the boat pulled by one o 
department vans on that special day for our community. 




73 



CSI Camp week, in cooperation with the Police Department, provided experiences in law enforcement, crime 
•evention, crime scene procedures, evidence gathering, and analysis techniques, as well as visits to the local 
)lice station and Newburyport District Court. Demonstrations by a K-9 unit and Ballistics and Bomb Squads 
om the Massachusetts State Police were presented to all the campers and CSI enrollees the week of the 
ogram. 

unity advocacy services were provided on an as-needed basis to families in need who met with the youth director 
determine their current needs and secure connections to available services. Regular meetings provided further 
onitoring and coordination of related services. In addition, the director was available for after-hours support and 
isis intervention for at-risk families. 

^gular training sessions were provided for summer and school year staff members to maintain their skills in safety 
actices, basic first aid, student motivation, conflict resolution, and group management. 



^^■^i^^^^^f^^^^'jfif 




XJNCIL ON AGING 

ane Mitchell, Director 



wide variety of programs for senior citizens of Ipswich were provided under the umbrella of Council on 
;ing Services. 

senior center operated weekdays, 8:00-4:00, at the Town Hall. Three part-time receptionists welcomed 
ests, answered the phone, and assisted with the daily operation of the center. 

gular programs included a book discussion group, bridge and card groups, knitting and quilting groups, art 
sses, a monthly lunch club and a single friends group. Health-related programs included monthly health 
eenings, weekly blood pressure clinics, a monthly nutrition program, massage, hearing clinics, yoga. 

74 



exercise, ballroom dancing, line dancing classes and a swimming group. The COA Travel Club attended tw< 
overseas trip sponsored by the Friends of the Ipswich Elderly and day trips to various locations were held 
throughout the year. 

Special offerings included an inter-generational program, various dining programs, an Elder Law Education 
program, a summer picnic, a North Shore Youth Symphony recital, computer clinics, speakers on a variety ot 
health, financial and legal issues, social gatherings for special observances and classes for a wide range of 
interests. A monthly newsletter written by the Director reached over 2000 elder households through support j 
local advertisers and a grant for postage. A Caregivers Support Group helped those dealing with frail elders. 
The Director continued to coordinate the Senior Citizen Property Tax Work-Off Program. A seven-member i 
TRIAD Council consisting of local law enforcement and seniors offered safety awareness programs geared j 
towards elders within our community. 

A handicapped accessible, 1 1 -passenger van provided local transportation to Ipswich seniors. Ipswich senio j 
citizens were provided 3,908 one-way rides on the COA van, logging approximately 13,451 miles of service I 
The Friends group continued to raise funds and support projects that fell outside of the COA budget. The 
Friends also contributed to a Christmas party for 190 seniors held in the gymnasium of the town hall. Grants 
from the Executive Office of Elder Affairs and the Coburn Charitable Society provided a part-time 
administrative assistant, a part-time activities coordinator, and a volunteer recognition luncheon. 

The Outreach program enlisted a corps of 31 volunteers who provided 1945 hours of volunteer service to loc 
elders. This program also provided volunteers who drove senior citizens 17,244 miles to out-of-town medics j 
appointments. Other services of the Outreach program included social visits, phone calls, help with chores, a j 
guidance in making personal, medical, housing and financial decisions. Other assistance programs included 
Money Management and Bill Paying for elders and free income tax preparation provided by trained AARP 
volunteers. 



A 7-member council met monthly to review programs and operations and plan additional offerings. 






DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS' SERVICES 
EASTERN ESSEX DISTRICT 

Terrance P. Hart. District Director 

This department is charged under Chapter 1 15 Massachusetts General Laws with providing services to veteran 
survivors and dependents. Principal workload under state law includes the administration of aid to veterans anc 
dependents. Communities fund this program, which is subsequently 75% reimbursed the following fiscal year 
Commonwealth. This is a need based program and the department is required to conduct periodic comprehensi j 
review of the cases to insure no substantive facts have changed, while working with the veteran to identify alte ji 
or long-term solutions to individual circumstances. During the calendar year 25 Ipswich veterans/widows were J 
this program for varying periods. Under state law the department also assists qualified veterans to obtain bonus j 
qualified veterans, widows and parents to obtain state annuities, property tax abatements, and other benefits. 

The Veterans' Services program also mandates extensive interaction within the federal community, principally^ 
the Department of Veterans' Affairs. The Veterans' Service Officer (VSO) assists veterans and their dependent 
filing for pensions, service connected injury/illness compensation, dependency indemnity compensation for 
survivors, VA healthcare enrollment, insurance claims, decedent claims, and many other issues. Federal benefi ; 
processed by this department are paid directly to those eligible to receive the assistance or entitlement. The VA 
approximately $1.69 million to eligible recipients in Ipswich, of which the current staff is responsible for 
approximately $685,000 dollars paid to or saved by those assisted in Ipswich. 

75 



iiitionally, the department interacts within the federal community to correct military records, obtain needed 
jmentation and insure veterans/dependents receive awards and recognition to which entitled. The VSO provided 
rmation, advice or assistance to 108 of the town's 1 120 identified veterans and 27 of the 295 identified veterans' 
ows during 2009. We also provide support and information assistance for National Guard and Reserves called up 
iervice in Iraq or Afghanistan and their families. 

Director and the Assistant to the Director, Georgia Gadbois, advocate for veterans on issues at the local, state and 
>ral level, interact with elected and appointed officials on issues, and work with local organizations in serving the 
munity. During 2009 the District also provided veterans' services assistance to the City of Gloucester and the 
r n of Topsfield as requested/authorized by the Board of Directors and the Massachusetts Department of Veterans' 
ices. 

Eastern Essex District is composed of the Towns of Essex, Georgetown, Hamilton, Ipswich, Rowley, Wenham, 
West Newbury. A Board of Directors consisting of one selectman or a designee from each town maintains 
sight. Mr. Ray Morley is the Ipswich member of the Board of Directors. 

TILITIES DEPARTMENT 

n Henry, Director 

.ECTRIC DIVISION 

ry Cavanaugh, Operations Manager 

June of 2009, Jerry Cavanaugh joined the Light Department team bringing 39 years of industry experience 
th him. Jerry's value to the department was immediate in that he helped staff from both the Power Plant and 
le Crews in getting the new Vermette Court Sub-station completed on time and under budget. 

e Power Plant continues in the ISO's (Independent System Operator) Forward Reserve Market with 8 MW's 
the power plant's generation assets. Under this program the department is paid for being available for 
patch within 30 minutes of notification, Monday thru Friday. The operation of the plant in this market is 
ng overseen by Jeff Turner as the Assistant Power Plant Superintendent. 

/h sales 

37 sales 107,856,587 

38 sales 108,020,523 

39 sales 106,145,327 

October 2009 the department signed a contract with AAER of Canada for the purchase of a 1.65 Mw Wind 
rbine to be installed at the end of Town Farm Road. Work was completed in December on the new 
nsmission which runs from the site to the Fowlers Lane sub-station. The new renewable energy asset is 
)ected to be on line in 2010. 

$ht Commissioners voted in June 2009 to sign a power sales agreement with Ridgewood Renewable LLC for 
bare of the output from a Landfill Gas project located in Johnston, Rhode Island. Once completed and on-line 
rly 2012) this project along with our other renewable energy projects will bring our renewable portfolio to 
6 % of our overall power supply while reducing our greenhouse gas production by 44% over 2007 amounts. 



76 



WATER & WASTEWATER DIVISIONS 

Vicki Halmen, Manager 

WATER DIVISION 

Total water pumping has remained at historic lows, the lowest volume in 20 years. The department activel ;| 
promotes water conservation measures and continued the seasonal rate structure, which was started in 2002 
curb excessive summer water use. 

Construction of the South Main Street and Central Street water main replacement was successfully complei 
June 2009. Existing 10-inch cast iron mains which were 115 years old were replaced with new 12-inch diu . 
iron pipe. The department would like to thank the community for its patience and cooperation during 
construction. We are committed to improving our aging infrastructure and will continue developing projec 
increase the reliability of the water system. 

NEW MAINS 

There were zero (0) extensions to the distribution system in 2009: 

2009 

New Domestic Services 8 

Hydrants Installed 
Hydrants Replaced4 

New Water Mains Installed (ft) 

Total Length of Mains (ft) 496,405 

Water Services 

Metered Services 4641 

Unmetered Services 101 Fire Lines 

Water Usage (Million Gallons 

Reservoirs (Dow and Bull Brook) 203 

Brown's Well 62 

Essex Road Well 19 

Fellows Road Well 32 

Mile Lane Well 30 

Winthrop Wells 7 

Total Water Usage (MG) 353 

WATER TREATMENT PLANT 

Joseph Ciccotelli, Superintendent 

2009 continued to be a year of upgrades, changes and challenges. Wright-Pierce Engineering completed the 
feasibility study and recommendations for the most ambitious project the Water Treatment Plant has undert 
since coming on line in 1988. The Dow Reservoir Improvements include major infrastructure operational ar 
structural upgrades that will be completed during the next two years, and enhance our source water quality i 
availability. 

77 



inthrop Well #2 was taken out of service, cleaned and rehabilitated, as part of our routine preventive 
untenance program to restore the capacity and quality of our groundwater well sources. 

e data collection and compliance monitoring requirements of the Environmental Protection Agency and 
partment of Environmental Protection Drinking Water Regulations were completed in 2009. Several new 
;ulations were introduced by EPA and DEP in 2009 which will impact the department (Groundwater Rule. 
ad and Copper Rule Updates. ERP Enhancements and changes to the 310 CMR 22.00 Regulations regarding 
iffing Requirements and Facility Upgrades). 

ASTEWATER DIVISION 

xick J. Brennan. Superintendent 

>he & Bond Consulting Engineers completed the review of the plant's Solids Handling Process. The 
jested improvements were reviewed by Tim Henry, Vicki Halmen. Ron Chandler and Pat Brennan with 
mt from the plant staff. A plan was developed to separate the multimillion dollar upgrade into three phases, 
is will minimize disruptions to the daily treatment process while allowing construction to proceeded in a 
lely faction. Bonding for phase 1 is planned for 2010 Town Meeting and (should it be approved) construction 
jld start this summer. 

Infiltration & Inflow (I&I) Study was conducted on the wastewater collection system in 2009. The study 
luded rehabilitation of 52 manholes; approximately 15.000 feet of pipeline cleaned, closed circuit televised, 
i joint tested and sealed; and approximately 14,300 feet of pipelined cleaned and closed circuit televised to 
»k at the condition of pipe and potential infiltration sources. The project identified several sources of I&I 
ich will be scheduled for repair in Summer 2010. 

mificant Data from 2009: 

• • 404 Million Gallons of wastewater was treated at our Facility. 
■ • 7.5 Million Gallons of Septage was received and treated. 

• 59.6 inches of rain was recorded. 

• 3,072 cubic yards of Bio-solids were removed from the wastewater stream, were dewatered and 
transported to the Agresource Compost Facility for beneficial reuse. 



^^^^^^^^^^^^^^! 



NANCE DIRECTORATE 

:a M. Negri, Finance Director 

XOUNTING OFFICE 

;a M. Negri, Town Accountant 

e Finance Director is the chief financial advisor to the Town Manager. She is responsible for debt sen ice. 
urance benefits and other miscellaneous budgets. She submits revenue projections for budget purposes; 
«ts with the Town Manager and department heads to review expenditure budgets: determines base budgets 
' the next budget cycle. She provides advice to the selectmen, finance committee and the school committee of 
y significant changes in the town's financial condition and changes in the legislation affecting municipal 
ances. 



78 



The Town Accountant's Office consists of two full time staff, a full time Town Accountant who serves as ; 
Finance Director and an Assistant Town Accountant. The Accounting Department is responsible for procei 
the payroll for all employees, processing invoices for vendor payments and preparing all W-2 and 1099 for 1 
the end of the year in compliance with IRS regulations. 

The Town Accountant's Office maintains all of the accounting records for the Town revenues and expendi, 
ensures that reconciliations are performed between applicable departments; assists in providing informatio ! 
benefits available to employees and oversees the operation of the Town financial computer system. 

The Town Accountant also coordinates the annual independent audit of the Town's financial statements thj 
was last completed by November 30, 2009 for the year that ended on June 30, 2009. The financial results :| 
Fiscal Year 2009 were good. This is due to good collections on receivables and responsible spending on 
appropriations. 

Free cash for fiscal year 2009 was certified by the Massachusetts Department of Revenue of Local Service] 
October 6, 2009 in the amount of 628,313. 



:f; $: % ^ :); ^ % % -fc * * % * % 



TRESAURY DEPARTMENT 

Kevin A. Merz, Treasurer/Collector 

The Treasurer/Collector is responsible for the investment of all Town funds and the collection of Real Est; 
taxes, Personal Property taxes, Motor Vehicle and Boat excise taxes. The Treasurer/Collector's office is a 
responsible for all municipal borrowings, balancing cash and accounts receivable with the Town Accounta 
selling beach stickers, accepting Passport applications, processing Municipal Lien Certificates and continu 
collection efforts of properties in Tax Title. 

In 2009, the Treasurer/Collector's office sold 5,457 beach stickers, 262 fishing stickers and 26 horse sticke 

Thanks goes out to Don Carter, the Assistant Treasurer/Collector and Corinna Warner, the collections cler] 
the Treasurer/Collector's office for their dedication, hard work and great customer service in 2009. 



:!<:**# lie** ******* 

ASSESSORS OFFICE 

Frank J. Ragonese, Chief Assessor 

The total valuation of Real Estate and Personal Property January 1, 2009, was $2,446,150,549. 
The valuation of the Town by Class is: 







$ 


% 


Class i 


Residential 


2,175,491,225 


88.9353 


Class II 


Open Space 


- 


- 


Class III 


Commercial 


113,798,094 


4.6521 


Class IV 


Industrial 


128,337,360 


5.2465 




Personal Property 


28,523,870 


1.1661 




Total: 


2,446,150,549 
79 


100.00 



le Tax Rate for Fiscal Year 2010 was $1 1 .54 per thousand for all property classes. 

»wn Clerk/Chief Election Officer 

mela Z. Carakatsane, CMMC, CMC 

Population as of December 2009 - 1 3,661 
>mparative Vital Statistics Recorded 

2007 2008 2009 



irths 


105 


90 


87 


:aths 


68 


118 


122 


images 


117 


59 


59 


ellfish Licenses and Permits 








2007 


2008 


2009 


sident Yearly 


84 


100 


105 


sident Family 


154 


174 


185 


sident Commercial 


125 


125 


125 


er 70 Commercial 


15 


14 


13 


er 60 Recreational 


34 


22 


31 


n-Resident Yearly 


196 


250 


- 274 


n-Resident Daily 


53 


25 


16 


gle Hill Stickers 


5 


9 


5 



>g Licenses 

ring 2009 the Town Clerk's Office registered dogs: 2,053 

assachusetts Department of Fisheries and Wildlife 

senses Sold: 167 Stamps Sold: 94 

actions and Registrations 

The Board of Registrars 

The Board of Registrars is comprised of the following members: 

Peter Ross, Chairman 

Jeremy Hathaway 

Diane Young 

Pamela Z. Carakatsane, CMMC, CMC 

Robert M. Stone (resigned May 2009) 

80 



II. Town Meetings: 

May 12, 2009 Annual Town Meeting 



ID. Elections: 

May 19, 2009 



There were 219 registered voters who attended. 
Twenty six articles were on the warrant. 



October 19, 2009 Special Town Meeting 



There were 601 registered voters who attended. 
Sixteen articles were on the warrant. 



Annual Town Election 

Votes Cast: 1,664 

Number of Registered Voters: 1 0, 1 20 

Turnout: 16.44% 



December 8, 2009 Special State Primary Election (Senate Seat vacated by death of 
Edward M. Kennedy) 



Votes Cast: 


2,196 


Number of Registered Voters: 


10,068 


Turnout: 


22.00% 



Precinct 



Registered Voters by Precinct as of December 31, 2009 - 10,082 

Democrat Republican Unenrolled Libertaria n 



1 


569 


351 


1,355 


1 


2 


677 


328 


1,595 


1 


3 


467 


493 


1,672 


1 


4 


585 


381 


1,598 





Totals 


2,298 


1,553 


6,220 


3 



The Town also had residents enrolled in the following political designations: 

Green Party USA Precinct 2, 2 residents 

Green Rainbow Precinct 1, 1 resident; Precinct 3, 1 resident; Precinct 4, 1 resident 

American Independent Precinct 1, 1 resident 

Inter 3 rd Party Precinct 2, 1 resident; Precinct 3, 1 resident 

Thank you to my Assistant, Kathy Marini; Office Volunteer, Janet Trask; the Board of Registrars; the 
Constables, Wardens, Clerks, Checkers, Provisional Ballot and Tally persons; James Graffum and his staff 
Rick Dorr and Jason Dorr; the Ipswich Police Department; the YMCA staff; and to the staff at the High 
School/Middle School who help set up for Town Meeting. Also, to volunteers Andrew Agapow, Ronald 

81 



Graves. Robert Stone and Phil Grenier and my family members who spend many hours setting up the night 
before each election. They all have helped to make each Election and Town Meeting a success. 



IANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEM (MIS) 

reg Parachojuk. MIS Director 

tie MIS department is charged with the ongoing mission to develop, enhance and support the Town's computing and 
lecommunications infrastructure and, to provide the system and services necessary for the Town's departments and 
;ers to fulfill their stated goals and objectives. 

s a board member of ICAM", Ipswich Community Access Media. Inc. my charter is to provide technical advice as 
the needs of our public, educational, and government sectors in conjunction with cable broadcasting. 

11 of our replacement hardware is purchased as energy efficient and "Open Source" software is used whenever 
>ssible. 

ne web took on a new look, content was increased and updated, and navigation was improved. We were awarded 
e 2009 eGov Common Cause Award with Distinction which was held at the State House. 

ease visit our website at hup:// vv ww . to wn. ipswich .ma. us to access assessment data, tax maps, minutes, online 
ivments, forms and other useful information. 

'SWICH PUBLIC LIBRARY 

ictor Dyer, Director 

Elections : New books added: 3595 (Adult & Young Adult) and 2228 (Children). New media added: 538( Adult & 
oung Adult) and 235(Children). 

;chnology : 9.200+ patrons signed up to use the Internet PCs while 24,800+ hits were recorded on the library's web 
te in 2009. Our website is continuously improved and maintained by Assistant Library Director Genevieve Picard. 
le library made available for use three new databases: Facts on File World News Digest. Facts on File World Atlas 
Ferguson's Career Guidance Center. Tutor.com expanded its sen ice to include adults with the Student Center. 
allege Center & Career Center. Over 3100 sessions were recorded on the databases we offer. 

.aff: Laura Hoffmann was hired as Senior Library Technician — Circulation upon the retirement of Susanne 
mmons. Elaine Ricci was hired as Library Technician — Circulation upon the retirement of Natalie Berry. Mary 
irgeant was hired as Library Technician upon the resignation of Susan Brown. Beth Uhring also resigned in 2009. 
ichelle Guvendiren returned as Temporary Summer Assistant in the Children's Room. Natalie Berry was rehired as 
Circulation Desk Assistant. 

plunteers : This year Volunteers donated over 1319 hours of service. Two community service high school students 
)lunteered hours this year. The Ipswich Garden Club decorated the library for the holidays while Dorcas Rice 
^orated the mantel in the Rogers Room. The annual Appreciation Breakfast for volunteers was sponsored by the 
"iends. 



82 



Board of Trustees : Library Trustee Nancy L. Thompson passed away on October 20, 2009. The Trustees contu 
$9000 from LIG/MEG monies towards replacement of the library's oil burners with new gas burners. The Tru p 
also paid for computer equipment and the installation of a new counter in the Young Adult area. The Trustees 
approved changes in two circulation desk job descriptions: Senior Library Technician and Library TechnicianJ 

Plan of Service : We continue to make progress on realizing the goals and objectives of our Plan of Service for |> 
2013. Some of the activities accomplished in 2009 included: creation of a Teen Advisory Board, a survey solic i 
opinions for improving the library's website and new library hours (9:00AM-8:00PM M-W, 9:00AM-5:00PM] 
with weekend hours remaining the same). The library sponsored its first, annual juried art exhibit & sale in Mi< 
Twenty-six Ipswich artists participated in this event which was attended by 160 guests. New furnishings were 
purchased for the Young Adult area. Fiction collections were weeded in all departments. Film showings for ch i 
were begun during school vacation weeks. 

Public Relations : The 140 lh anniversary of the founding of the Ipswich Public Library was celebrated with an <j$ 
house reception on March I st . The library produced one issue of The Newsletter in 2009. The Ipswich Reads... 
Book! Program continued into a fifth year with Jackie French Roller's The Primrose Way, a novel set in 17 th c 
Ipswich. Betsy Johnson's submitted four 'Library Life' columns to the Ipswich Chronicle in 2009. The librar 
represented in the 375 th anniversary parade by a float of children at story time together with 45 marchers, inch | 
Library staff, Trustees, volunteers and patrons. 

Building : The Facilities Dept. installed new tile in the foyer of the library and new oak shelving for DVDs. T 1 
gas burners were installed, as well. A fall clean up of the library grounds, including the painting of the cast iro 
was accomplished under the direction of the Facilities Dept. with the help of the state correctional department. 

Friends : The Friends supported the library with funds for audio-visual materials, binding, printing, aquarium 
maintenance, supplies & children's programs. They purchased a Venmil Buffing Machine that is used to resto 
scratched DVDs, CDs, and books on CD. 

Bequests & Gifts : Donations were received in memory of Library Trustee Nancy L. Thompson. Stephanie Ma j 
Rose, Myron Taylor & Margaret G. Spencer. Other donations were received from the Ipswich Garden Club, R 
Nunziato, Frieda Arkin and Jay Chipman. Mr. Jerry Bowman donated a framed set of six 19 th century photogi 
Ipswich houses. Robert & Mary Weatherall donated a framed photograph of writer John Updike, who died in \ \ 
as well as an Updike poster. Paul & Debbie Wegzyn donated a DVD copy of A Fireside Chat: Polish-America I 
Community. Stendhal Tree donated their services to prune the crab apple tree. 

Programs : The Children's Dept. offered 162 programs with 3,108 children participating. There were 11 Adult/ ; 
programs with 97 participants. The ESL program continues to match students with tutors. A new book club for 
graders was started with an initial group of 7 children. A new section was added to the Book Buddies book clu j 
3 rd graders. A new book club for adults on personal development books began meeting at the library under the I 
direction of Jim McCormack. 

Circulation : Total circulation in 2009 was 148,835 items. [This is a 5.2% increase over 2008] The library borrcj 
monthly, on average, 1286 items through interlibrary loan. [This is a 16.9% increase over 2008] 

Grants : The library received a $1400 grant from the Coburn Charitable Society for the purchase of large print ; 
audiovisual materials and a $600 NMRLS Supplementary Deposit Collection grant which was used to further d 
the collection of audio-books in the Playaway format. 2009 was the second year of the Teens & Tweens grant, 
federally funded with LSTA funds through the Massachusetts Board of Library Commissioners. 

Archives : We logged in 390 visits to the Archives by researchers & volunteers in 2009. Ms. Mary Ricci of 
Brookline, N.H. donated twenty-five historical documents relating to Ipswich, dating from 1785 to 1887. 

83 



:hool department 

chard L Korb, Superintendent 

le FY09 school year was highlighted with significant accomplishments, as well as challenges and 
portunities. We continued to face fiscal difficulties which impacted the district's ability to deliver the 
ucational services this community has come to expect and deserve. However, with the assistance of the 
ieral and State stimulus funds from the "State Fiscal Stabilization Fund," as well as the federal "IDEA" and 
itle I" grants, we were able to avoid major cuts to personnel and programs. 

ir dedicated and talented staff continues to provide the best educational opportunities for every child Pre-K to 
^ grade. Our Birth-to-Three program continues to flourish, serving hundreds of families across the 
mmunity. This program is entirely funded by a State grant and parent contributions. Our "Tiger Tots 
arning Center" day care program for school employees and citizens in the community continues to grow and 
urish. 

ir MCAS scores continue to place us far above the State average, despite the fact that our per pupil 
Denditures is far below the State average. However, even with that success, we are committed to improve our 
)res. Each year teams of teachers spend hours analyzing our test results and make the necessary adjustments 
our curriculum to ensure that we are aligned with the State Frameworks. 

ring the FY09 school year the district continued to work with the Town Electric Light Department to plan for 
purchase and installation of the wind turbine using the schools' share of the SI. 6 million CREBS loan from 
federal government. During this same time we successfully completed the "Energy Management Systems" 
grade at the Middle/High School, which is resulting in significant energy savings. 

i addition to the Middle/High School projects, we continue to benefit from previous energy-saving initiatives, 
luding the new boiler at the Winthrop Elementary School, new roofs at the Winthrop and Doyon Elementary 

! lools, new doors and windows at the Doyon School, and new energy-efficient lighting in our elementary 
ools and Central Office (Payne School) building. 

i FY09 school year also saw two new administrators join the district: Mr. Dave Archambault replaced Dr. 
n Cooper, who retired as the Doyon Elementary Principal; and Ms. Mary Gallant joined the District as the 
i ector of Pupil Personnel Services, replacing Diana Minton who also retired. 

1 1 Ipswich Public Schools continues to be recognized across the Commonwealth for a variety of educational 
iatives, including the integration of technology into our curriculum. During the FY09 school year we were 
ognized as having achieved "Highly Qualified" status for all of our teachers in keeping with "No Child Left 
lind." Our curriculum delivery model is unique and highly effective as all decisions regarding curriculum 
. elopment and implementation are made by our Subject Area Committees, which consist of classroom 
:hers and administrators. High School, Middle School and Elementary School staff meet regularly to ensure 
t our curriculum is seamless, thus providing our students with a comprehensive Pre-K to 12 curriculum. 
, : goal of the Ipswich Public Schools is to identify and access resources and implement strategies that 
, wove teaching and learning, enrich programs and inspire students and teachers. It is through a very special 
• :rnal culture within our school system that we are able to turn this goal into reality through a variety of 
lding-based initiatives and programs. The ultimate goal of this special culture is to have students become 
-directed learners who strive toward continuous improvement through reflection and self-assessment. 



84 



In conclusion, I want to express my sincere appreciation to the citizens of Ipswich who have given so 
generously to support quality education for all of our children. I also want to thank those local businesses an 
organizations that continue their support of our programs through gifts and donations. 
Finally, I want to express my sincere appreciation to the staff of the Ipswich Public Schools, whose dedicatio 
and commitment to excellence is second to none. 

IPSWICH HIGH SCHOOL 

Barry Cahill, Principal 

The 2009 school year included a number of experiences and successes for our high school student body. Our' 
excellent MCAS results continued with every senior meeting the Graduation Requirement. 

The state of the economy demonstrated itself in a number of ways. While college acceptance and attendance ] 
continued at a 90% level, there was a shift to public colleges and two year colleges. 20% of our graduates 
enrolled in a two year program, a shift that may continue for a few years. Students were accepted at our natic 
finest universities and colleges including M.I.T. (Mass. Institute of Technology), Boston College, Skidmore, 
Wake Forest, Carnegie Mellon and Bowdoin. Students in the Class of 2009 were accepted at almost 200 
colleges and universities. 

A unique opportunity presented itself in the Spring of 2009, when 21 members of the High School Jazz 
Ensemble joined with 28 Middle School students on a 10 day tour of China. Spending time in Beijing and X j , 
students toured all the famous sites from the Forbidden Temple and Tiananmen Square to the Great Wall of 
China. Three days were spent with students living with host families in a sister Middle School in the industri| 
city of Tianjin. Our Jazz Ensemble performed twice, each time before an audience of over 1,000 people. 
Students had an experience that will impact them for many years as they truly experienced a totally different 
culture. 

Donations from local business have truly helped us during demanding economic times. The Institution for 
Savings contributed to two great improvements to our facilities. At a cost of $170,000 they built a new 
soccer/lacrosse field at Mile Lane. This enhanced our ability to use our limited space to its maximum. They ; J 
contributed to $163,000 to assist us with the completion of the rigging in our Performing Arts Center along \ 
an upgrade to the sound system. New England Biolabs continued their annual $10,000 donation which provi 
funds to each school as well as covering an all day workshop for K-12 science teachers. EBSCO likewise 
extended their generosity to fund part of a full day workshop for social studies teachers. Individual donations 
continue to help us purchase textbooks and technology. We are fortunate to have such generous benefactors. 

IPSWICH MIDDLE SCHOOL 

Cheryl Forster, Principal 

I am pleased to be reporting to the citizens of Ipswich in my fifteenth year as principal of this dynamic and 
exciting school. We are now in the tenth year in this building enjoying the warm learning environment we hs 
created here together. The school design has allowed us to get to know our students very quickly and each gr e 
has developed its own culture creating three distinct neighborhoods. The facility has allowed students and 
teachers to access 21 Century skills and innovative teaching techniques as well as world-class art, music, and 
drama programs. Our two gyms are never empty during the day or weekends. Our students continue to learn 
"new basics" along with the old ones, as we find that both are truly important in today's world of work. 

Educating students has never been more challenging with the added mandated testing we now administer in 8 
grades. Test results we received validated the good work being done in our classrooms by our teachers. 
MCAS testing is rigorous. Ipswich Middle School is proud to report that we have tested higher than 87% of a] 

85 



Massachusetts Middle Schools and number one in math on the North Shore. We are establishing data teams to 
study successful practices and improve even more what we do. 

Ipswich Middle School is adding global education to its goals. We have developed a sister school relationship 
with Tianjin, China. We travelled last April to China with a group of teachers and students and they in turn have 
come here to learn from us. The world is shrinking and we will give our students the best possible chances for 
success by opening the doors on the other side of the globe. 

Excellent middle schools strive to reach the all-important whole child. Each grade level specializes in 
exploratory and child centered topics that offer a variety of learning experiences and opportunities. At the 
Ipswich Middle School we work in a "team" approach. The schedule allows for teachers to meet daily and 
discuss student's progress; and class size is limited for maximum skill building. It is a cooperative venture. 
Middle School is a time of choices and contrasts. Whether it is the quiet solitude of our peaceful courtyard 
complete with koi fish, or the pandemonium in the gym created by middle school energy — there is something 
for everyone here at IMS. 

Students in grade 6 spend an intensive and focused week in the spring at an environmental camp. Ferry Beach 
in Saco, Maine. All of our sixth grade staff attends to form close bonds with the students. The outdoor marine 
curriculum is high interest, and many new friends and relationships are forged. 

Grade seven students learn firsthand about the local ecology with a series of eight separate days in the woods, 
marshes and in canoes on the Ipswich River, seeing first hand where their river begins and ends. They canoe 
through miles of forest, wetlands and marsh, collecting data all the way and brainstorming ways to protect our 
precious environment and natural resources. 

Grade eight students spend four days in early June in the Adirondacks in upper state New York. A geology 
focus helps prepare them for visits to chasms and caves and learn the difference first hand between stalactites 
and stalagmites in Howe Caverns. They cruise the glacial lakes and rivers and come to appreciate the power of 
erosion and glacial landforms. It is a wonderful culminating experience for them as they leave Middle School. 
We continue to provide an after school homework program for all interested students and their families and we 
understand the need for students to be busy and supervised after the last school bell rings. We offer many 
enriching programs to meet the interests of all types of children. Our drama, dance and music departments 
involve more than half of our student population. Student athletes participate in sports programs that teach 
skills, sportsmanship and wellness. At the peak of intramural basketball season, more than 250 students are 
involved. We offer golf, tennis, soccer, ice hockey, softball, volleyball, field hockey, basketball, track, art club, 
math club, computer club, chess club, student leadership, recycling, music programs, drama and monthly 
dances. We enforce a "no bully" zone and we have successfully created a respectful and sensitive learning 
environment. A monthly "service" component has taken the form of pet drives, shoe and coat drives, Haiti help, 
soldier boxes and turkey dinners. We also participate in the annual "Walk for Hunger" where together we walk 
a 10-mile circuit around Great Neck and back to raise substantial funds for the Ipswich Food Pantry. 

We are proud to be part of such an innovative and exciting learning environment. Our outstanding professional 
faculty works diligently to clarify our vision for education — that every child can learn. We are constantly 
finding new ways to reach and teach all children who come to our school — they are after all, the future of 
Ipswich. It is an exciting time to be working with young people. Our slogan is "making a difference starts 
hhere." We believe that, we love our work and we invite you to join us. 



86 



DOYON SCHOOL 

David Archambault, Principal 

After an extensive principal search process, this past school year saw the turning over of the "reins" at the Paul 
Doyon School from longtime principal Dr. Kenneth Cooper to me, Mr. David Archambault. Amazingly, I am ji 
the third principal at the school since it opened its doors in 1964. 

The newest School Improvement Plan is again targeting "Literacy," in particular, consistency in writing outcorri 
and writing instruction. Last year the suggestion was made and adopted by staff to form Study Groups to explo- 
several different approaches to writing instruction. This year, our goal is to use the knowledge gleaned from th< : 
study groups to devise a scope and sequence for Writing Instruction K-5. 

Assessment is also a major focus of the school improvement plan. Now that we have come to agreement on ma;' 
of the formal assessments we are using, concentration has been on more informal assessments created by the 
teachers themselves. This marks the first year we have a dedicated form in students' cumulative folders that 
summarize all major assessments given during their time at Doyon. 

This past year we continued our school safety and character development initiatives. The Ipswich Fire Departm t 
provided fire safety programs; the Ipswich Police Department provided the DARE program and a stranger 
awareness program in grades four and kindergarten respectively; the H. A.W.K. (Help for Abused Women anc 
Children) organization again presented an anti-bullying program at several grade levels; our Guidance Departrr I 
presented a six- week program called "Talking about Touch" to grade two students; we are piloting an anit-bulh » 
program called Steps to Respect at grade five, and for the rest of the grades, the Doyon FRIES (Friends of Ipsw 
Elementary Schools) funded a wonderful anti-bullying school wide assembly program called "Wizards and 
Knights." The FRIES also provided funding for our "Student Leadership Team," (SLT). The Rotary-linked Ea, 
Act program continues with fifteen faculty and staff mentors working alongside more than 60 fourth and fifth g c- 
students. Some of the projects included helping younger students in classroom work or physical education, art ( 
music classes, volunteering in the library, assisting with recycling efforts, planning school "Spirit" days, and 
providing assistance during Grand Friends' Days. We believe that in providing students with opportunities to 
contribute to our school and to our community, as well as to other communities in need, we are having a posith 
impact on students' sense of responsibility, and empathy for others, while also building their own self-esteem. 
On this, the occasion of my first annual report, I would like to extend a special thanks to all who have welcome 'o 
to both the learning and the larger community of Ipswich with open and welcoming arms. I sincerely love my j 
and look forward to a long future here. 

WINTHROP SCHOOL 

Sheila McAdams, Principal 

Isn't it amazing the difference a year can make? January drifted in with the snow spreading changing economic 
times and fiscal concerns. Our theme of "Community" took on new meaning as we watched families struggling 
to provide stability to their children. Impending layoffs announced in February were staved off by stimulus 
funds from the federal government. Like the houses battered by the waves on Plum Island, our educational 
foundation continues to weaken under the strain of the fiscal conditions washing our way. 

Within our walls, the outstanding efforts of our learning community yield positive dividends. Assessment 
practices and writing instruction were our top priorities this year. Designing measures of student performance 
and reflecting on effective teaching strategies is a large component of our professional discourse. State testing 
suggests that more defined writing instruction is required for all of our youth. To this end, curricular 
development is occurring among all of our grade level teams. 

87 



[n past years, the Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education (DESE) measured student 
Derformance solely through achievement testing. Less than stellar scores often encourage a revamping of 
;ommonly-used practices. This fall, the DESE unveiled a growth index to compliment the achievement 
-eporting. Winthrop's growth scores validated that our practices are effectively fostering learning in all of our 
/outh. 

One wonderful validation of quality was realized this fall with the National Association for the Education of 
foung Children accreditation of both Doyon and Winthrop's kindergarten programs. While time-consuming 
ind lengthy, the process assured intense program evaluation. We are thrilled but not surprised that quality 
>egins in our early childhood settings. 

One of our critical attributes is the manner by which we treasure, nurture and develop our culture of caring and 
espect. Our School Improvement Plan and 2009-2010 school- wide theme of "Empathy" recognize the 
mportance of culture on the overall learning environment. From Ballroom Dance celebrations to our Bright 
lappy Power service week, the Kid to Kid Bully Prevention program to the launching of our Afterschool 
Community Enrichment offerings, our learning community is a respectful, action-packed and engaging place to 
>e! 

Some people think only intellect counts: knowing how to solve problems, knowing how to get by, knowing 
low to identify an advantage and seize it. But the functions of intellect are insufficient without courage, love, 
riendship, compassion and empathy. ~ Dean Koontz 




DEPARTMENT OF SPECICAL EDUCATION SERVICES 

4ary L. Gallant, Director of Pupil Personnel Services 

'his is my first year as Director of Special Education Services in the Ipswich Public Schools. We provide 
ervices to our students with disabilities as mandated by federal regulations and the Massachusetts Department 
f Elementary & Secondary Education. 

Ve have a strong support system of special education teachers and therapists. There is an increased emphasis on 
^searched based education and progress monitoring of students. Our educators, in the future, will continue to 
mphasize these areas. 



88 



We look forward to the next school year and the Coordinated Program Review by the Massachusetts 
Department of Elementary & Secondary Education. We will continue activities responsive to the compliant 
requirements of this Review. 

HALL HASKELL HOUSE STANDING COMMITTEE 

Terri Stephens and Stephanie Gaskins, Co-chairs 

The Hall-Haskell-House continues in its mission of serving the community at large. The gallery attracts a 
number of artists to display work in various media and the nearly year-long schedule offers a nice selection 
art on display for sale to the community. The Visitor Center is a must for tourists as they explore the North 
Shore. Bill Nelson and Louise Ciolek manage a great group of dedicated volunteers who are present and of 
good suggestions to the tourist visiting the area. The house is used from early May through December and i 
the winter there is an artist in residence on the site. The Hall-Haskell- House building continues to provide ; 
nice resource to the community. 



IPSWICH BAY CIRUIT COMMITTEE 

Lawrence G. Eliot, Chair 

The Ipswich Bay Circuit Trail Committee consists of several Ipswich residents who meet monthly, second 
Tuesday of the month at 7:30 pm at Town Hall. Our purpose is to promote interest in and use of the extensi> 
trail system in Ipswich and to act as a clearinghouse to collect information about the trails. While we try to 
monitor trail conditions, (due to limited resources) we cannot guarantee their condition. Therefore, we rely 
on trail users and volunteers to report conditions and undertake any needed maintenance. We encourage 
members of the community to contact us and attend our meetings. 

The Bay Circuit Guide to Walks in and Around Ipswich continues to sell well and can be purchased at local 
stores. The Guide includes: digital maps, new sketches of the flora through a grant from the Ipswich Arts 
Council and text revisions as needed. 

The Committee has worked to insure that trails are open and are well marked. As land is developed, the 
committee continues to work with the Open Space Committee, Planning Board and Conservation Commissii 
to see that trails are preserved and kept open for the enjoyment of residents. We are looking for trails that nt 
to be rediscovered and mapped. If you have walked trails that you know and are not mapped, we would like 
share your knowledge with the community. 

Guided trail hikes have continued to be organized, advertised in the Chronicle and led by members of the 
Committee. This informal walking/hiking group continues to meet at Town Wharf parking lot on Wednesda 
at 9:30 to explore local trails. This group endeavors to walk all Ipswich sections of the Bay Circuit Trail at kit 
annually, as well as other trails in town such as Strawberry Hill, Willowdale Mill, New England BioLabs, 
Apppleton Farms, Crane's Beach, Town Hill, Hamlin Reservation, Julia Bird Reservation, Turner Hill, 
Willowdale State Forest and Greenwood Farm among others. Although we monitor the condition of the traih 
we do not guarantee that all trails are safe, well marked, or cleared of debris. 



89 



GOVERNMENT STUDY COMMITTEE 

Gerry Anne Brown. Chair 

The Government Study Committee is an advisory committee that makes recommendations to the Board of 
Selectmen (BOS). The committee's mission includes making a more efficient, effective local government. In 
late fall, the committee was asked by the Board oi' Selectman to review the more than fifty-four (54) Town 
Boards and Committees to see which ones are active , meeting at suitable and appropriate locations and open to 
the public. The committee welcomed Diana Hebert in 2008 and Charlotte Eliot in 2009 as new. - 
members. We meet monthly and are looking for additional members. 

RECYCLING COMMITTEE 

Tim Bishop. Chair 

The Recycling Committee provides community outreach support for recycling efforts in Ipswich and advice to 
the Town of Ipswich concerning solid waste and recycling issues. The new Waste Reduction Program will help 
reduce solid waste management costs for the town, which allows your tax dollars to be spent on roads, safety 
and education. It provides an incentive to increase waste diversion and recycling, and it's a more equitable 
system for sharing costs. The proposal recommends that effective July 1, 2010 the only change to the current 
system will be for households that produce more than one container of trash per week. With this W'aste 
Reduction Program, the first bag or barrel of trash will be collected at no charge (max. volume 35-gallon/ max. 
weight 50 lbs.). Excess trash can be disposed of in specially marked bags, Ipswich Official Waste Reduction 
Program green overthrow trash bags. These bags should be placed on top or next to the first free barrel. 

TRUST FUND COMMITEEE 

Robert K Weatherall, Chair 
fean Emerson 
Alexander Colby 

The clouds which hung over the economy in 2008. depressing share prices began to lighten in spring of 2009 
)ut it was not till the fall that the funds in the Commission's care regained the value that they had before the 
"ecession. 

ITie loss in value of the Commission's holdings in 2008 persuaded the board in July to switch the time being 
entirely to bonds. In November of 2008, with share prices steadying, the Commission voted to return to the 
equity market with a 30% allocation of the Commission's assets to equity. 

Because of restrictions placed by fund donors on the spending of the principal, the Commission was able to 
ipprove scholarship awards to high school seniors graduating in 2009 from only two of its scholarship funds, a 
t>500 scholarship from the Thibeault fund and four S500 scholarships from the High School Scholarship fund. 



90 



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